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The Cambridge Introduction to Milton
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Details

  • 5 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 266 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.54 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 821/.4
  • Dewey version: 23
  • LC Classification: PR3588 .D53 2012
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Milton, John,--1608-1674--Criticism and interpretation

Library of Congress Record

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Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521898188)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$90.00 (P)
The Cambridge Introduction to Milton
Cambridge University Press
9780521898188 - The Cambridge Introduction to Milton - By Stephen B. Dobranski
Frontmatter/Prelims

The Cambridge Introduction to Milton

John Milton is one of the most important and influential writers in English literary history. The goal of this book is to make Milton’s works more accessible and enjoyable by providing a comprehensive overview of the author’s life, times, and writings. It describes essential details from Milton’s biography, explains some of the cultural and historical contexts in which he wrote, offers fresh analyses of his major pamphlets and poems – including Lycidas, Areopagitica, and Paradise Lost – and describes in depth traditional and recent responses to his reputation and writings. Separate sections focus on important concepts or key passages from his major works to illustrate how readers can interpret – and get excited about – Milton’s writings. This detailed and engaging introduction to Milton will help readers not only to understand better the author’s life and works but also to appreciate why Milton matters.

Stephen B. Dobranski is Professor of early modern literature and textual studies at Georgia State University.


Cambridge Introductions to …

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Jane Austen Janet Todd
Samuel Beckett Ronan McDonald
Walter Benjamin David Ferris
Chekhov James N. Loehlin
J. M. Coetzee Dominic Head
Samuel Taylor Coleridge John Worthen
Joseph Conrad John Peters
Jacques Derrida Leslie Hill
Charles Dickens Jon Mee
Emily Dickinson Wendy Martin
George Eliot Nancy Henry
T. S. Eliot John Xiros Cooper
William Faulkner Theresa M. Towner
F. Scott Fitzgerald Kirk Curnutt
Michel Foucault Lisa Downing
Robert Frost Robert Faggen
Nathaniel Hawthorne Leland S. Person
Zora Neale Hurston Lovalerie King
James Joyce Eric Bulson
Thomas Mann Todd Kontje
Herman Melville Kevin J. Hayes
Milton Stephen B. Dobranski
Sylvia Plath Jo Gill
Edgar Allan Poe Benjamin F. Fisher
Ezra Pound Ira Nadel
Marcel Proust Adam Watt
Jean Rhys Elaine Savory
Edward Said Conor McCarthy
Shakespeare Emma Smith
Shakespeare’s Comedies Penny Gay
Shakespeare’s History Plays Warren Chernaik
Shakespeare’s Poetry Michael Schoenfeldt
Shakespeare’s Tragedies Janette Dillon
Harriet Beecher Stowe Sarah Robbins
Mark Twain Peter Messent
Edith Wharton Pamela Knights
Walt Whitman M. Jimmie Killingsworth
Virginia Woolf Jane Goldman
William Wordsworth Emma Mason
W. B. Yeats David Holdeman

Topics

American Literary Realism Phillip Barrish

The American Short Story Martin Scofield

Anglo-Saxon Literature Hugh Magennis

Comedy Eric Weitz

Creative Writing David Morley

Early English Theatre Janette Dillon

English Theatre, 1660–1900 Peter Thomson

Francophone Literature Patrick Corcoran

Literature and the Environment Timothy Clark

Modern British Theatre Simon Shepherd

Modern Irish Poetry Justin Quinn

Modernism Pericles Lewis

Modernist Poetry Peter Howarth

Narrative(second edition) H. Porter Abbott

The Nineteenth-Century American Novel Gregg Crane

The Novel Marina MacKay

Old Norse Sagas Margaret Clunies Ross

Postcolonial Literatures C. L. Innes

Postmodern Fiction Bran Nicol

Russian Literature Caryl Emerson

Scenography Joslin McKinney and Philip Butterworth

The Short Story in English Adrian Hunter

Theatre Historiography Thomas Postlewait

Theatre Studies Christopher B. Balme

Tragedy Jennifer Wallace

Victorian Poetry Linda K. Hughes


The Cambridge Introduction to Milton

Stephen B. Dobranski


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi, Tokyo, Mexico City

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521726450
© Stephen B. Dobranski 2012

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2012
Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library

ISBN 978-0-521-89818-8 Hardback
ISBN 978-0-521-72645-0 Paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


for Shannon and Audrey


Contents

List of figures
ix
Preface
xi
Chronology
xiv
List of abbreviations
xviii
Chapter 1     Life
1
Too much information?
2
Character and early years, 1608–1638
4
Italy, 1638–1639
13
Poet and pamphleteer, 1639–1648
15
Government employee, 1649–1660
21
Life after the Restoration, 1660–1674
25
Chapter 2     Contexts
31
Literary traditions and predecessors
33
Literary contemporaries
50
The book trade
63
The civil wars
68
Theology
78
Chapter 3     Prose
94
Anti-prelatical tracts
95
Divorce pamphlets
104
Areopagitica (1644)
117
Commonwealth prose
127
Chapter 4     Poetry
141
“On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity” (1629)
143
L’Allegro and Il Penseroso (1631)
145
A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle (1634)
147
Lycidas (1638)
152
Sonnets (1629–1658)
158
Poems (1645)
161
Paradise Lost (1667, 1674)
165
Paradise Regained (1671)
181
Samson Agonistes (1671)
187
Chapter 5     Afterlife
195
Notes
210
Further reading
227
Index
234

Figures

1           Milton’s London residences. Wenceslaus Hollar, A New Map of the Citties of London, Westminster & ye Borough of Southwarke (1675). The British Library
6
2           “Portrait of John Milton at the Age of Ten,” by Cornelius Janssen van Ceulen. The Pierpont Morgan Library
8
3           Frontispiece and title page from Poems of Mr. John Milton, Both English and Latin, Compos’d at Several Times (1645). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
161
4           Diagram of the cosmos in Paradise Lost, by David A. Ruffin
177
5           George Romney, “Milton and His Two Daughters,” from The Poetical Works of John Milton, 3 vols., ed. William Hayley (London, 1794). The Folger Shakespeare Library
201

Illustration acknowledgements

Wenceslaus Hollar’s map of London on which I have plotted Milton’s residences (Fig. 1) is reproduced by permission of The British Library Board (shelfmark maps C.6.d.8). The “Portrait of John Milton at the Age of Ten” (Fig. 2) is reproduced by permission of The Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, whose staff produced the transparency (shelfmark AZ163). The frontispiece and title page from Poems of Mr. John Milton (Fig. 3) are reproduced by permission of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin (shelfmark Pforz. 722), whose staff produced the original photographs. The diagram of the cosmos in Paradise Lost (Fig. 4) is reproduced from Walter Clyde Curry, Milton’s Ontology, Cosmogony, and Physics (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1957). Special thanks are due to Lori Howard of Georgia State University for creating the digital images for this and the 1645 Poems’s illustration. “Milton and His Two Daughters” (Fig. 5) is reproduced by permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library, whose staff created the digital image.





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