Cambridge Catalog  
  • Your account
  • View basket
  • Help
Home > Catalog > The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre
The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre
AddThis

Details

  • 20 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 268 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.55 kg
Add to basket

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521869867)

  • Also available in Paperback
  • Published December 2009

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$85.00 (P)
The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre
Cambridge University Press
9780521869867 - The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre - By Simon Shepherd
Table of Contents

Contents

List of illustrations
x
Foreword
xiii
Chapter 1Where it happens
1
National theatre
1
A central theatre
1
A racial theatre
3
A people’s theatre
6
A nationalised theatre
9
A concrete building
13
Buildings and their people
17
Actor-managers
17
Owners
18
Managers
22
Buildings
24
State funding
29
Audience
31
Who is the audience?
32
What is an audience?
35
Against the theatre institution
41
Shows without theatres
48
Performance for specific communities
48
Performances in specific places
50
Interfaces
52
Useless buildings
56
Chapter 2Who does it
65
The organisation of actors and companies
65
Repertory
66
Ensembles
68
Collectives
73
Collaborations
76
The work of actors
79
The emergence of training
79
Producing the English actor
80
Producing the ‘modern’ actor
82
Amateurs
86
Actors as activists
90
Non-acting
93
The politics of performing modes
97
Directors
102
The emergence of the director
102
Methods of direction
104
Company style
108
Writers
110
Chapter 3What they make
119
The readable tradition
119
Shaw
120
Travers and Coward
122
Stoppard and Ayckbourn
125
Poetic drama
129
The reappearance of the Chorus
129
Verse and poetry
131
Marginalising the poetic
134
Realisms
136
Naturalisms
136
Expressive realism
139
Abstracting realism
149
Deferring to the real: theatre as ‘document’
158
‘Cruelties’
165
Other than words
173
Atmospheres
174
Being physical
178
Provisional fictions
180
Duress and duration
183
Chapter 4Why they do it
189
Movements and manifestos
189
Responsible theatres: the Whig tradition
189
The Workers’ Theatre Movement
190
Feminist theatres
193
Suffrage
193
Second-phase feminism
195
Gay theatres
200
‘Black’ theatres
205
Theatre of disability
210
‘Community’ and ‘applied’ theatres
213
Theatre in education
214
Community theatre
215
Applied theatre
216
Making good theatre
220
Afterword
228
Bibliography
229
Index
240



© Cambridge University Press
printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis