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The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies
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  • 10 b/w illus. 2 tables
  • Page extent: 248 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.51 kg
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 (ISBN-13: 9780521856225)

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The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies
Cambridge University Press
9780521856225 - The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies - By Christopher B. Balme
Frontmatter/Prelims

The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies

Providing thorough coverage of the methods and tools required in studying historical and contemporary theatre, this introduction examines the complexities of a rapidly changing and dynamic discipline. Following a cross-cultural perspective, the book surveys the ways theatre and performance are studied by looking initially at key elements such as performers, spectators and space. The central focus is on methodology, with sections covering theatre theory, historiography, and textual and performance analysis. The book covers all the main theatrical genres – drama, opera and dance – providing students with a comparative, integrated perspective. Designed to guide students through the academic dimension of the discipline, the volume emphasizes questions of methodology, research techniques and approaches, and will therefore be relevant for a wide variety of theatre studies courses. Informative textboxes provide background on key topics, and suggestions for further reading are included at the end of each chapter.

Christopher B. Balme is Professor of Theatre Studies at the University of Munich.

The Cambridge Introductions to . . .

Authors

Jane Austen Janet Todd

Samuel Beckett Ronan McDonald

Walter Benjamin David Ferris

J. M. Coetzee Dominic Head

Joseph Conrad John Peters

Jacques Derrida Leslie Hill

Emily Dickinson Wendy Martin

George Eliot Nancy Henry

T. S. Eliot John Xiros Cooper

William Faulkner Theresa M. Towner

F. Scott Fitzgerald Kirk Curnutt

Michel Foucault Lisa Downing

Robert Frost Robert Faggen

Nathaniel Hawthorne Leland S. Person

Zora Neale Hurston Lovalerie King

James Joyce Eric Bulson

Herman Melville Kevin J. Hayes

Sylvia Plath Jo Gill

Edgar Allan Poe Benjamin F. Fisher

Ezra Pound Ira Nadel

Jean Rhys Elaine Savory

Shakespeare Emma Smith

Harriet Beecher Stowe Sarah Robbins

Mark Twain Peter Messent

Virginia Woolf Jane Goldman

W. B. Yeats David Holdeman

Edith Wharton Pamela Knights

Walt Whitman M. Jimmie Killingsworth

Topics

The American Short Story Martin Scofield

Creative Writing David Morley

Early English Theatre Janette Dillon

English Theatre, 1660–1900 Peter Thomson

Francophone Literature Patrick Corcoran

Modernism Pericles Lewis

Modern Irish Poetry Justin Quinn

Narrative (second edition) H. Porter Abbott

The Nineteenth-Century American Novel Gregg Crane

Postcolonial Literatures C. L. Innes

Russian Literature Caryl Emerson

Shakespeare’s Comedies Penny Gay

Shakespeare’s History Plays Warren Chernaik

Shakespeare’s Tragedies Janette Dillon

The Short Story in English Adrian Hunter

Theatre Historiography Thomas Postlewait

Theatre Studies Christopher Balme

Tragedy Jennifer Wallace


The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies

Christopher B. Balme


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521672238

© Christopher B. Balme 2008

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2008

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Balme, Christopher B.
The Cambridge introduction to theatre studies / Christopher B. Balme.
 p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-521-85622-5
1. Theater. I. Title.
PN2037.B25 2008
792–dc22 2008026920

ISBN 978-0-521-85622-5 hardback
ISBN 978-0-521-67223-8 paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Contents

List of plates
viii
List of figures
ix
List of tables
x
Preface
xi
Introduction: theatre and theatre studies
1
Integrated theatre studies
3
From theatre studies to performance studies
11
Outline
12
Part I        Elements of theatre
15
Chapter 1     Performers and actors
17
Theory and analysis
18
Pedagogy of acting
22
Cross-cultural perspectives
28
Chapter 2     Spectators and audiences
34
Spectator response
36
Reception and response
38
Audiences
42
Chapter 3     Spaces and places
47
Theatrical space
49
Stage space
54
The place of theatre
58
Part II       Subjects and methods
63
Chapter 4     Theories of theatre 1: historical paradigms
65
Mimesis
67
Poiesis
69
Catharsis
72
Chapter 5     Theories of theatre 2: systematic and critical approaches
78
Semiotics
78
Poststructuralism and psychoanalysis
83
Phenomenology
85
Cultural materialism
87
Theatricality and performance theory
89
Chapter 6     Theatre historiography
96
Sources and reconstruction
97
Theatre iconography
102
Periodization
106
Contemporary approaches
111
Summary and outlook
116
Chapter 7     Text and performance
118
Status of the text
119
From drama to theatrical text
125
Play, production, performance
127
Chapter 8     Performance analysis
132
Notation and documentation
134
Tools of analysis
136
Goal of analysis
142
Methods and models
143
Chapter 9     Music theatre
147
Elements
147
Music dramaturgy
149
Text and staging
152
Analysis: La Bohème and Ariodante
152
Chapter 10    Dance theatre
161
Elements
161
Movement analysis: notation, semiotics and ideology
163
Analysis: Petrushka and Enter Achilles
166
Part III      Theatre studies between disciplines
177
Chapter 11    Applied theatre
179
Examples of applied theatre
179
Historical trajectories
183
Theoretical paradigms
188
Research methods
191
Outlook
193
Chapter 12    Theatre and media
195
Theatre as a medium
196
Theatre and other media
201
Intermediality
205
Notes
209
Bibliography and other resources
212
Index
226

Plates

1.          Bunraku-style puppets used by the Handspring Puppet Company in their production of Monteverdi's Il Ritorno d’Ulisse (1998). Photo: Herman Sorgeloos
10
2.          The passions according to Charles Lebrun. Source: Private Collection
20
3.          Ryszard Ciéslak in the first version of The Constant Prince, Teatr Laboratorium, 13 Rzędów, Wrocław, 1965. Photo: Teatr Laboratorium
26
4.          Théâtre du Soleil, 1789 (1970). An example of environmental theatre. Photo: © Martine Franck/Magnum Photos/Agentur Focus
51
5.          View of the hanamichi, the ‘flower way’ of the Kabuki stage at the Kanamaru-za Theatre on the island of Shikoku. Photo: Christopher B. Balme
52
6.          Nineteenth-century playbill for the New Theatre Royal, Dunlop Street, Glasgow. Photo by permission of the Special Collections Department, Glasgow University Library
100
7.          Virtual Vaudeville Project, University of Georgia. Reconstruction of The Union Square Theatre, New York, 1895–6. Photo courtesy of David Saltz
103
8.          The artists’ garret in Baz Luhrmann's production of Puccini's La Bohème (1993). Photo: Kiren Chang, courtesy of Opera Australia
156
9.          Ian MacNeill's set design for the opera Ariodante by Handel, Bavarian State Opera (2000). Photo: Wilfried Hösl
159
10.         DV8 Physical Theatre: Enter Achilles. Photo: Peter Jay
172

Figures

1.          Psychodynamic processes involved in creating a role (after Konstantin Stanislavsky’s Rabota Aktera nad Soboi [The Actor's Work on Oneself] (Moscow: Iskusstvo, 1950): 632)
23
2.          Forms of theatrical space (after Carlson 1987: 67)
49
3.          Structure of theatrical space (after Carlson 1987: 68)
54
4.          The triadic model of the sign (after Charles Sanders Peirce)
79
5.          Relationship between text and production
129
6.          Model of communication (after Shannon and Weaver)
197
7.          Graphical representation of the human–machine interface in Stelarc's Ping Body performance. Photo: Digital Aesthetics, Artspace, Sydney, 10 April 1996. Diagram: Stelarc, STELARC
204

Tables

1.          Brecht's comparison of cathartic (dramatic) and critical (epic) theatre
76
2.          Theatrical sign systems (after Kowzan 1968)
82
3.          Sources for theatre history
98
4.          Periodization in European theatre historiography
108
5.          Tools for performance analysis
136
6.          Models of performance analysis: dramatic theatre
145
7.          Models of performance analysis: music theatre
154
8.          Models of performance analysis: dance theatre
166




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