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The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment
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  • 18 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 267 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.44 kg
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 (ISBN-13: 9780521720908)

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The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment
Cambridge University Press
9780521896351 - The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment - By Timothy Clark
Frontmatter/Prelims

The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment

The degrading environment of the planet is something that touches everyone. This book offers an introductory overview of literary and cultural criticism that concerns environmental crisis in some form. Both as a way of reading texts and as a theoretical approach to culture more generally, ‘ecocriticism’ is a varied and fast-changing set of practices which challenges inherited thinking and practice in the reading of literature and culture. This introduction defines what ecocriticism is, its methods, arguments and concepts, and will enable students to look at texts in a wholly new way. Boxed sections explain key critical terms and contemporary debates in the field with ‘hands-on’ examples and comparisons. Timothy Clark's thoughtful approach makes this an ideal first encounter with environmental readings of literature.

Timothy Clark is a specialist in Romantic, Heideggerian and post-Heideggerian poetics and in environmental criticism. He has held appointments in Finland, Australia and now works in the English Department of the University of Durham. His books include Derrida, Heidegger, Blanchot: Sources of Derrida's Notion and Practice of Literature (Cambridge 1992, paperback edition 2008), The Theory of Inspiration: Composition as a Crisis of Subjectivity in Romantic and Post-Romantic Writing (1997, 2000), Charles Tomlinson (1999), Martin Heidegger (2001) and The Poetics of Singularity: The Counter-Culturalist Turn in Heidegger, Derrida, Blanchot and the Later Gadamer (2005).


The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment

Timothy Clark


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi, Dubai, Tokyo, Mexico City

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521720908

© Timothy Clark 2011

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2011

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Clark, Timothy (Timothy John Andrew), 1958–
The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment / Timothy Clark.
 cm. – (Cambridge Introductions to Literature)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-521-89635-1 (hardback) – ISBN 978-0-521-72090-8 (paperback)
1. Ecocriticism. 2. Nature in literature. I. Title.
PN98.E36C53 2010
809′.933553 – dc22 2010042725

ISBN 978-0-521-89635-1 Hardback
ISBN 978-0-521-72090-8 Paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party Internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Annelle

(For Anne)


Contents

List of illustrations
xii
Preface
xiii
Acknowledgements
xiv
Introduction: the challenge
1
Anthropocentrism
3
The literary and cultural criticism
3
A crisis of the ‘natural’
5
The natures of nature
6
A reading
8
First quandary: climate change
10
Romantic and anti-romantic
Chapter 1     Old world romanticism
15
Romantic ecology
15
The self-evidence of the natural?
18
The inherent greenness of the literary?
19
A reading: the case of John Clare
21
Deep ecology
23
Chapter 2     New world romanticism
25
A reading: retrieving Walden
30
Wild
33
Chapter 3     Genre and the question of non-fiction
35
‘You don't make it up’
36
Fiction or non-fiction?
38
An aesthetic consumerism
39
A reading: genres and the projection of animal subjectivity
42
Second quandary: fiction or non-fiction?
44
Chapter 4     Language beyond the human?
46
A realist poetics
47
The Spell of the Sensuous
48
Third quandary: how human-centred is given language?
52
Chapter 5     The inherent violence of western thought?
55
The archetypal eco-fascist?
59
The forest
60
Chapter 6     Post-humanism and the ‘end of nature’?
63
A reading: Frankenstein
66
Ecology without nature?
69
The boundaries of the political
Chapter 7     Thinking like a mountain?
77
The aesthetic
80
Fifth quandary: what isn't an environmental issue?
85
Chapter 8     Environmental justice and the move ‘beyond nature writing’
87
Social ecology
89
A reading: A River Runs Through It
90
Environmental criticism as cultural history?
93
Sixth quandary: the antinomy of environmental criticism
94
Chapter 9     Two readings: European ecojustice
96
Chapter 10    Liberalism and green moralism
102
The limits of liberal criticism
105
A reading: William and Dorothy Wordsworth
108
Seventh quandary: the rights of the yet-to-be-born
110
Chapter 11    Ecofeminism
111
An écriture ecofemine?
114
‘Nature provides us with few givens’
117
Chapter 12    ‘Post-colonial’ ecojustice
120
Environmentalism as neocolonialism?
120
Is there yet a specifically environmental post-colonial criticism?
122
Colonialism as the ‘Conquest of nature’
123
A reading: Amitav Ghosh, The Hungry Tide
126
Eighth quandary: overpopulation
127
Chapter 13    Questions of scale: the local, the national and the global
130
Methodological nationalism
131
Literary ‘reinhabitation’?
132
Questions of scale
136
Ecopoetry
139
Science and the struggle for intellectual authority
Chapter 14    Science and the crisis of authority
143
The disenchantment thesis
143
Facts versus values? a reading, Annie Dillard's ‘Galápagos’
145
The ‘naturalistic fallacy’
145
Against the facts–values split
148
Ecology, ‘ecology’ and literature
151
Hubert Zapf, Literature as Cultural Ecology
153
Chapter 15    Science studies
156
Studying science as a kind of behaviour
156
The Selfish Gene
157
Donna Haraway
158
Ninth quandary: constructivism and doing justice to non-human agency
163
Chapter 16    Evolutionary theories of literature
165
The Standard Social Science Model
165
Literature and human nature
167
Chapter 17    Interdisciplinarity and science: two essays on human evolution
171
Tenth quandary: the challenge of scientific illiteracy
176
The animal mirror
Chapter 18    Ethics and the non-human animal
183
‘Kiss goodbye to the idea that humans are qualitatively different from other animals’
185
Human–animal
186
Twelfth quandary: reading the animal as ‘construct’
190
Chapter 19    Anthropomorphism
192
An art of animal interpretation
195
A reading: The Wind in the Pylons
198
Chapter 20    The future of ecocriticism?
202
Final brief quandary: what place environmental criticism in the modern ‘University of Excellence’?
203
Notes
204
Further reading
231
Index
244



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