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Understanding Ageing
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Details

  • 34 b/w illus. 10 tables
  • Page extent: 224 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.34 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 574.3/72
  • Dewey version: 20
  • LC Classification: QP86 .H65 1995
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Aging--Physiological aspects

Library of Congress Record

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Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521478021 | ISBN-10: 0521478022)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$52.00 (C)

This book presents a completely novel approach to understanding aging: it explains both why aging exists in animals and reviews our current understanding of it at the biological level. Dr. Holliday argues that much research needs to be done on the cellular and molecular aspects of aging if the origin of age-related diseases is to be understood. In making this argument, the author draws on material from a wide range of disciplines, including extensive biomedical information about age-related disease in humans. This thought-provoking book will appeal to all students and researchers who are interested in aging, whether they are working in the clinical or basic research sphere.

Contents

Preface; Author's note; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; 2. The evolved anatomical and physiological design of mammals; 3. Maintenance of the adult organism; 4. Theories of ageing; 5. Cellular ageing; 6. Genetic programmes for ageing; 7. The evolution of longevity; 8. Human disease and ageing; 9. A better understanding of ageing; Notes; References; Author index; Subject index.

Reviews

"This is a remarkable book in that it lucidly explains the complex processes of aging, from theories and evolution to genetic and cellular mechanisms, in a short and concise manner....Both clinicians and basic researchers interested in aging will find this book very useful." Leo Miller, Doody's Health Sciences Book Review Journal

"...a superb overview with emphasis on the cellular and molecular biology of ageing--an aspect today enjoying immense popularity." Leonard Hayflick, Nature

"...very competently does the job of demystifying the aging process (set forth by the author in the preface) especially by providing a solid evolutionary base for aging as a biological phenomenon." Choice

"...a valuable introduction to those students planning to study cellular and molecular aspects of aging. They are likely to gain a comprehensive view of what has been accomplished and of the important directions for future research, all set within the context of evolutionary theory....a worthy addition to this series." Avril D. Woodhead, BioScience

"Understanding Ageing is unique in its coverage of a wide range of topics ranging from theories of aging to the evolution of longevity to disease processes associated with aging. The greatest strength of the book is the way in which the author brings together the evolution of longevity and specific biochemical/molecular processes that are involved in cell maintenance. Dr. Holliday's long-term interest in molecular biology and the evolution of longevity has allowed him to discuss these two relatively unrelated areas of aging in a way that is both informative and unique in a book on aging." Arlan Richardson, Experimental Gerontology

"...a scholarly piece of work that gives both an overview of the aging phenomenon and a cohesive picture of such a complex issue." Suresh I.S. Rattan, Perspectives in Biology and Medicine

"Holliday's text is original, in that it takes evolutionary reasoning as the basis for an understanding of mechanics of ageing....Holliday writes about them in a direct and energetic style that makes his text highly readable. I would certainly recommend it to students....an excellent text." Linda Partridge, Tree

"The text is laid out very clearly with short concise sections and a small number of clear, monochrome illustrations. I have used my reviewer's copy of the book to look up some details of CD4-HIV interaction and I would expect to continue using it well into the future." Bernadette Hannigan, BioEssays

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