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Home > Catalog > Patriarchy, Property and Death in the Roman Family
Patriarchy, Property and Death in the Roman Family
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Details

  • 30 tables
  • Page extent: 266 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.56 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 306.85/0945/632
  • Dewey version: 20
  • LC Classification: HQ511 .S35 1994
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Families--Rome
    • Patriarchy--Rome
    • Property--Rome

Library of Congress Record

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Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521326032 | ISBN-10: 0521326036)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$124.00 (C)

The Roman father has traditionally provided the pattern of patriarchy in European thought. This book shows how the social realities and cultural representations diverged from this paradigm. Demographic analysis and computer simulation demonstrate that before adulthood most Romans lost their fathers by death. Close reading of Latin texts reveals Roman fathers as devoted and loving, and not harsh, exploitative masters of slaves. The demographic and cultural contexts deepen our understanding of how the patrimony was transmitted.

Contents

1. Introduction: approaches to the history of the Roman family; Part I. Roman Life Course and Kinship: Biology and Culture: 2. Roman patterns of death, marriage and birth; 3. Simulations of Roman family and kinship; Part II. Roman Family and Culture: Definitions and Norms: 4. Familia and domus: defining and representing the Roman family and household; 5. Pietas and patria potestas: obligation and power in the Roman household; 6. Whips and words: discipline and punishment in the Roman household; Part III. The Devolution of Property in the Roman Family: 7. Strategies of succession in Roman families; 8. Guardianship of Roman children; 9. Dowries and daughters in Rome; 10. Conclusion; Bibliography; Index.

Reviews

"...a remarkable book, impressive in its command of diverse materials and methodologies and certain to inspire further advances." American Historical Review

"The current prominence of the Roman family as a field of research is due in large part to a series of stimulating studies written over the last decade by Richard P. Saller, whose already considerable achievements now culminate in a book of great importance for historians of Roman society....[A] remarkable book, impressive in its command of diverse materials and methodologies and certain to inspire further advances." Keith Bradley, American Historical Review

"This is clearly a book that historical demographers and European family historians, as well as scholars of classical history, will want to add to their libraries. However, it is also a book that offers students of the modern family much to think about." Caroline Brettell, Amercan Journal of Sociology

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