Cambridge Catalog  
  • Your account
  • View basket
  • Help
Home > Catalog > English Population History from Family Reconstitution 1580–1837
English Population History from Family Reconstitution 1580–1837
AddThis

Details

  • 123 tables
  • Page extent: 684 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 1.001 kg
Add to basket

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521022385 | ISBN-10: 052102238X)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$115.00 (C)

English Population History from Family Reconstitution is the second part of the single most important demographic enquiry of the past generation, the first part being The Population History of England, 1541-1871. This study proves that family reconstitution has been particularly successful in obtaining accurate information about the demography of past populations. The authors prove that the results obtained are representative of the demographic situation of the country at large. English Population History from Family Reconstitution will be an essential source of information for British social historians.

Contents

List of figures; List of tables; Part I: 1. Introduction; 2. The reconstitution parishes; 3. Representativeness; 4. Reliability; Part II: 5. Nuptiality; 6. Mortality; 7. Fertility; Part III: 8. Reconstitution and inverse projection; 9. Conclusion; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

Reviews

"...the volume...addresses the most perplexing and persistent problems regarding demographic history that is based on parish registers: how reliable or representative are the samples used and how tentative--or certain--are the conclusions derived from them?...this excellent study should prove almost as illuminating as the classic study it complements." Choice

"....intensely detailed....This work provides subtle additions to our knowledge of the English population's purely demographic behaviour..." David Levine, Journal of Interdisciplinary History

"Guaranteed to be an essential reference for European social historians, it eschews the excitement of speculation to convey more authority." Ernest Benz, Journal of Social History

"...an essential reference for all who work in the subjects or the period they have so masterfully surveyed." Theodore K. Rabb, American Historical Review

printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis