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Spatial Analysis in Field Primatology

Spatial Analysis in Field Primatology
Applying GIS at Varying Scales

$49.99 (P)

Leila M. Porter, Francine L. Dolins, Nathan P. Nibbelink, Joanna Hatt, Margaret C. Crofoot, Amy Klegarth, Agustín Fuentes, Lisa Jones-Engel, Greg Marshall, Kyler Abernathy, Allison Howard, Roger Mundry, Karline R. L. Janmaat, Simone D. Ban, Christopher A. Shaffer, Sarah A. Boyle, Mitchell T. Irwin, Jean-Luc Raharison, Adam O. Bebko, Paul Garber, Christopher Boesch, Amy L. Schreier, Matt Grove, Stephen R. Ross, Marisa A. Shender, Anthony Di Fiore, Kenneth L. Chiou, Mary E. Blair, Jena R. Hickey, Michael J. Conroy, Travis S. Steffens, Shawn M. Lehman, Jason M. Kamilar, Lydia Beaudrot, Kerry M. Dore, Daniel Sewell, Eduardo M. Mattenet, Trudy R. Turner
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  • Date Published: March 2021
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107694309

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About the Authors
  • From foraging patterns in a single tree to social interactions across a home range, how primates use space is a key question in the field of primate behavioral ecology. Drawing on the latest advances in spatial analysis tools, this book offers practical guidance on applying geographic information systems (GIS) to central questions in primatology. An initial methodological section discusses niche modelling, home range analysis and agent-based modelling, with a focus on remote data collection. Research-based chapters demonstrate how ecologists apply this technology to a suite of topics including: calculating the intensity of use of both range and travel routes, assessing the impacts of logging, mining and hunting, and informing conservation strategies.

    • The first volume specifically for primatologists on the application of GIS, with practical guidance to encourage use of the technology, such as advice on the best field transmitters
    • Research-based chapters show how many of the leading spatial ecologists apply this technology to address central questions in primatology in diverse circumstances and research projects
    • Shows how GIS can help to assess the impact of logging, mining and hunting, and help to inform primate conservation strategies
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2021
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107694309
    • length: 460 pages
    • dimensions: 242 x 170 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.96kg
    • contains: 95 b/w illus. 24 colour illus. 42 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. GPS for Primatologists: Introduction Leila M. Porter
    1. Why place matters, and its use in primate behavioral and ecological research Francine L. Dolins
    2. Fundamentals of GPS AND GIS Nathan P. Nibbelink and Joanna Hatt
    3. 'Next-gen' tracking in primatology: opportunities and challenges Margaret C. Crofoot
    4. The ethical implications, and practical consequences, of attaching remote telemetry apparatus to macaques Amy Klegarth, Agustín Fuentes, Lisa Jones-Engel, Greg Marshall and Kyler Abernathy
    5. Processing geospatial data in R: a primer Allison Howard and Roger Mundry
    6. Estimating travel distance and linearity of primate routes: ideas on how to clean and smooth track data collected with a handheld GPS Karline R. L. Janmaat, Simone D. Ban and Roger Mundry
    Part II. GIS Analysis in Fine-Scale Space: Introduction Christopher A. Shaffer
    7. Home range analysis: why the methods matter Sarah A. Boyle
    8. Quantifying resource dispersion in free-ranging bearded sakis in Guyana: what is a patch? Christopher A. Shaffer
    9. Interpreting small-scale patterns of ranging by primates: what does it mean, and why does it matter? Mitchell T. Irwin and Jean-Luc Raharison
    10. Determining the presence of habitual travel route networks in orangutans (pongo pygmaeus morio) in Kutai National Park, Borneo Adam O. Bebko
    11. Finding fruit in a tropical rainforest: a comparison of the foraging patterns of two distinct fruit-eating primates across years Leila M. Porter, Paul Garber, Christopher Boesch and Karline R. L. Janmaat
    12. Random walk analyses in primates Amy L. Schreier and Matt Grove
    13. The use of small-scale spatial analysis to evaluate primate behavior and welfare in captive settings Stephen R. Ross and Marisa A. Shender
    14. The promise of spatially explicit agent-based models for primatology research Anthony Di Fiore
    Part III. GIS Analysis in Broad-Scale Space: Introduction Francine L. Dolins
    15. Modeling niches and mapping distributions: progress and promise of ecological niche models for primate research Kenneth L. Chiou and Mary E. Blair
    16. Does reduced habitat quality or increased hunter access explain defaunation of fragmented forests? Bonobos as a case study Jena R. Hickey and Michael J. Conroy
    17. Landscape ecology of deforestation processes and lemur biogeography in Madagascar Travis S. Steffens and Shawn M. Lehman
    18. Quantitative methods for primate biogeography and macroecology Jason M. Kamilar and Lydia Beaudrot
    19. GIS and GPS techniques in an ethnoprimatological investigation of St Kitts green monkey (chlorocebus sabaeus) crop-foraging behavior Kerry M. Dore, Daniel Sewell, Eduardo M. Mattenet and Trudy R. Turner
    20. Conclusion Francine L. Dolins.

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    Spatial Analysis in Field Primatology

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  • Editors

    Francine L. Dolins, University of Michigan, Dearborn
    Francine L. Dolins is an Associate Professor of Comparative Psychology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, USA. Her research investigates spatial cognition, navigation and foraging behavior with nonhuman primates in the lab using virtual reality, and also conducts field research, to integrate the understanding of species' cognitive capacities with socio-ecological factors. She has published two edited books with Cambridge University Press: Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare (1999); and Spatial Cognition, Spatial Perception: Mapping the Self and Space (2010).

    Christopher A. Shaffer, Grand Valley State University, Michigan
    Christopher A. Shaffer is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Grand Valley State University, Michigan, and Principal Investigator of the Konashen Ecosystem Health Project. His primary research and teaching interests focus on community ecology and behavioral ecology, particularly in the context of human-nonhuman animal interactions and natural resource management.

    Leila M. Porter, Northern Illinois University
    Leila M. Porter is Professor of Anthropology and Presidential Engagement Professor at Northern Illinois University. She studies the behavior and ecology of tamarins and Goeldi's monkeys in South America, specifically their diet, ranging, and patterns of infant care.

    Jena R. Hickey, University of Georgia
    Jena R. Hickey served as the Conservation Scientist for the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP) for 5 years. With over 20 years of professional experience, Jena has held positions with state and federal agencies, academic institutions, and not-for-profit organizations. She focuses on species occurrence, abundance, spatial distributions, movements, and habitat use, as well as how anthropogenic factors shape these response variables.

    Nathan P. Nibbelink, University of Georgia
    Nathan P. Nibbelink is Professor of GIS and Spatial Ecology in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia. He serves as Director of the Center for Integrative Conservation Research and the Integrative Conservation Ph.D. program. His research uses spatially explicit models to address landscape connectivity in a changing world, and to inform conservation and management of species and ecosystems.

    Contributors

    Leila M. Porter, Francine L. Dolins, Nathan P. Nibbelink, Joanna Hatt, Margaret C. Crofoot, Amy Klegarth, Agustín Fuentes, Lisa Jones-Engel, Greg Marshall, Kyler Abernathy, Allison Howard, Roger Mundry, Karline R. L. Janmaat, Simone D. Ban, Christopher A. Shaffer, Sarah A. Boyle, Mitchell T. Irwin, Jean-Luc Raharison, Adam O. Bebko, Paul Garber, Christopher Boesch, Amy L. Schreier, Matt Grove, Stephen R. Ross, Marisa A. Shender, Anthony Di Fiore, Kenneth L. Chiou, Mary E. Blair, Jena R. Hickey, Michael J. Conroy, Travis S. Steffens, Shawn M. Lehman, Jason M. Kamilar, Lydia Beaudrot, Kerry M. Dore, Daniel Sewell, Eduardo M. Mattenet, Trudy R. Turner

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