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Discursive Research in Practice
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Details

  • 6 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 332 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.654 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 150.19/8
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: BF201.3 .D572 2007
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Discursive psychology

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521849296)

Discursive Research in Practice Cambridge University Press
9780521849296 - DISCURSIVE RESEARCH IN PRACTICE - by
Frontmatter/Prelims


Discursive Research in Practice

Over the past few decades new ways of conceiving the relation between people, practices and institutions have been developed, enabling an understanding of human conduct in complex situations that is distinctive from traditional psychological and sociological conceptions. This distinctiveness is derived from a sophisticated analytic approach to social action which combines conversation analysis with the fresh treatment of epistemology, mind, cognition and personality developed in discursive psychology. This volume is the first to showcase and promote this new method of discursive research in practice. Featuring contributions from a range of international academics, both pioneers in the field and exciting new researchers, this book illustrates an approach to social science issues that cuts across the traditional disciplinary divisions to provide a rich participant-based understanding of action.

Alexa Hepburn is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough University.

Sally Wiggins is a Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at the University of Strathclyde.




Discursive Research in Practice
New Approaches to Psychology and Interaction

Edited by
Alexa Hepburn and Sally Wiggins




CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press,
New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521614092

© Cambridge University Press 2007

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception
and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements,
no reproduction of any part may take place without
the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2007

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Discursive research in practice: new approaches to psychology and interaction/edited by Alexa Hepburn and Sally Wiggins.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN: 978-0-521-84929-6 (hardback)

ISBN: 978-0-521-61409-2 (pbk)

1. Discursive psychology.

I. Hepburn, Alexa.II. Wiggins, Sally, 1975–
III. Title.
BF201.3.D572 2007
150.19′8–dc22
2006038546

ISBN: 978-0-521-84929-6 (hardback)

ISBN: 978-0-521-61409-2 (paperback)

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.




Contents

List of figurespage vii
List of contributorsviii
Acknowledgementsx

1

Discursive research: themes and debates
ALEXA HEPBURN AND SALLY WIGGINS
1

Part I Psychology in action
29
2Managing subjectivity in talk
DEREK EDWARDS
31
3Emotions in meeting talk
PIRJO NIKANDER
50
4Negotiating consciousness: parapsychology and the social organisation of reports of mental states
SIMON ALLISTONE AND ROBIN WOOFFITT
70
5Apologising-in-action: on saying ‘sorry’ to Indigenous Australians
MARTHA AUGOUSTINOS, AMANDA LECOUTEUR AND KATHRYN FOGARTY
88
6Mind, mousse and moderation
JONATHAN POTTER AND CLAUDIA PUCHTA
104

Part II Professionals and clients
125
7When patients present serious health conditions as unlikely: managing potentially conflicting issues and constraints
ANITA POMERANTZ, VIRGINIA TEAS GILL AND PAUL DENVIR
127
8Arguing and thinking errors: cognitive distortion as a members’ category in sex offender group therapy talk
CLARE MACMARTIN AND CURTIS D. LEBARON
147
9Members’ and analysts’ interests: ‘formulations’ in psychotherapy
CHARLES ANTAKI, REBECCA BARNES AND IVAN LEUDAR
166
10‘Suppose it wasn’t possible for you to go any further with treatment, what would you do?’ Hypothetical questions in interactions between psychiatrists and transsexual patients
SUSAN A. SPEER AND CERI PARSONS
182

Part III Youth and institutions
201
11‘Doing reluctance’: managing delivery of assessments in peer evaluation
JAKOB CROMDAL, MICHAEL THOLANDER AND KARIN ARONSSON
203
12A valid person: non-competence as a conversational outcome
ALESSANDRA FASULO AND FRANCESCA FIORE
224
13Discursive practices in talking problems during a school–family meeting
RICHARD BUTTNY AND SANDRA KELLOGG RATH
247
14Food abuse: mealtimes, helplines and ‘troubled’ eating
SALLY WIGGINS AND ALEXA HEPBURN
263
15Discursive research: applications and implications
SALLY WIGGINS AND ALEXA HEPBURN
281
Appendix: transcription notation292
References294
Index318



Figures

Figure 2.1Speech pressure waveform and pitch trace for the worst person on the planet.41
Figure 6.1Introducing the group108
Figure 6.2Moderator reads ‘astonishing’117
Figure 6.3‘First thought’120
Figure 6.4‘Little golf ball’120
Figure 6.5‘Amazing’120



Contributors

SIMON ALLISTONE is a Lecturer in Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York

CHARLES ANTAKI is Professor of Language and Social Psychology in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough University

KARIN ARONSSON is a Professor in the Department of Child Studies at Linköpping University, Sweden

MARTHA AUGOUSTINOS is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Adelaide

REBECCA BARNES is a Research Fellow in the Peninsula Medical School at the University of Plymouth

RICHARD BUTTNY is Professor of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University, New York

JAKOB CROMDAL is Associate Professor in the Department of Child Studies at Linköpping University, Sweden

PAUL DENVIR is a Graduate Student in the Department of Communication at the University at Albany, SUNY

DEREK EDWARDS is Professor of Psychology in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough University

ALESSANDRA FASULO is Professor in Psychology at the University of Rome ‘la Sapienza’, Italy

FRANCESCA FIORE is a Research Assistant in Psychology at the University of Rome ‘la Sapienza’, Italy

KATHRYN FOGARTY is a Research Assistant in the Department of Psychology at the University of Adelaide

VIRGINIA TEAS GILL is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Illinois State University

ALEXA HEPBURN is Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology in the Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University

SANDRA KELLOGG RATH is a Graduate Student in the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University, New York

CURTIS D. LEBARON is an Associate Professor in the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah

AMANDA LECOUTEUR is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Adelaide

IVAN LEUDAR is Reader in Psychology at the University of Manchester

CLARE MACMARTIN is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

PIRJO NIKANDER is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Psychology at the University of Tampere, Finland

CERI PARSONS is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Staffordshire University

ANITA POMERANTZ is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at the University at Albany, SUNY

JONATHAN POTTER is Professor of Discourse Analysis at Loughborough University

CLAUDIA PUCHTA is a Professor at the University of Applied Science, Lueneburg, Germany

SUSAN A. SPEER is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Brunel University, London

MICHAEL THOLANDER is Research Fellow in the Department of Child Studies at Linköpping University, Sweden

SALLY WIGGINS is Lecturer in Psychology in the Centre for Applied Social Psychology at the University of Strathclyde

ROBIN WOOFFITT is Reader in Sociology in the Department of Sociology at the University of York




Acknowledgements

Thanks are due to various people and organisations for practical, intellectual and psychological support. First and foremost, we would like to thank our contributors both for their sustained efforts in producing their excellent chapters to various deadlines, and for their speedy responses to our comments and suggestions. The Discourse and Rhetoric Group at Loughborough University provides a stimulating intellectual context, in particular, Derek Edwards and Elizabeth Stokoe are inspirational friends and colleagues. We would also like to thank Jonathan Potter for his helpful comments on our own chapters. Finally, thanks to Sarah Caro and Cambridge University Press for commissioning the book.




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