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The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing
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Details

  • 12 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 290 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.602 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 808/.042
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: PE1413 .M583 2007
  • LC Subject headings:
    • English language--Rhetoric--Problems, exercises, etc
    • Creative writing--Problems, exercises, etc
    • Report writing

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521838801)




Index




academies, higher education 241–247

   as open space 247–248

   as patrons of writing 23,82,249–251

   teaching and learning writing outside 44,46,234–257

Achebe, Chinua 41

activity, displacement 66

adaptation 73

agencies, literary 59

Albee, Edward 141

Allende, Isabel 164

amateur, honesty of 14

ambition, literary 15,30,56

Amis, Martin 104

anger, writing from 47

anti-narrative 89,163

Apollinaire, Guillaume 226

Aristotle 16–17,33,54

   Poetics 10,16

Arnold, Matthew 41

Ashbery, John 41

Atwood, Margaret 41,104,142,148,185,215

Auden, W. H. 41,67,194

audience 91,142,211

   as reader 216–217

   creating an audience 43,82,216,217–218,235

   writing for an audience 142,191

Austen, Jane 14,161

authenticity 211

background 47

Baker, George 16,116

Baudelaire, Charles 211

Beard, Richard 79

Beckett, Samuel 38,46,70,135,148

behaviour, studying human 101

Bellow, Saul 41

Berry, Cicely 219

Bierce, Ambrose 158

Bishop, Elizabeth 39,47,140

Blake, William 141,226

Blegvad, Peter 226

blogs see weblogs

Bloom, Harold 20,25,41,235

Bly, Carole 16,177

Boden, Margaret 242

Bohr, Niels vii,245

Boisseau, Michelle 50,196

Boland, Eavan 41

Booker, Christopher 9,164

Borges, Jorge Luis 148,158

Bowen, Elizabeth 127

Brahms, Johannes 133

Brande, Dorothea 97

Brodsky, Joseph 27,41,237

Brontë, Charlotte 88,92

Brontë, Emily 92,110

   Wuthering Heights 88,92,110

Brook, Peter 24

Burgess, Anthony 159

Burns, Robert 202

Burroughs, William 112

   and ‘cut-up technique’ 112

Byron, George Gordon 119,202

cadence 72

Calvino, Italo 75

Capote, Truman 159

Carlson, Ron 96,157

Carver, Raymond 43

Castiglione, Baldassare 18

Cavafy, Constantine 70

Chaplin, Charlie 14

characterisation, fictional 2,127,155,166,167–168,173

   main and viewpoint 168

Chatterton, Thomas 74

   suicide of 74

Chatwin, Bruce 27,102

Chaucer, Geoffrey 16

Chekhov, Anton 158,174,209

children, impact on writers having 71

‘circles for survival’ 56

clarity 90,135,137,200

Cocteau, Jean 106,187

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor 20,41

Collins, Billy 29

‘commonplace books’ 100,207

competitiveness 31,32,57,70

communities, creative 22–23,115,234–257

Connolly, Cyril 64

   Enemies of Promise 64

Conrad, Joseph 96,159

Coover, Robert 163

Cox, Ailsa 162

creative nonfiction 37,59,177–193,242

   and interviews 185,190–191

   and memory 185

   and point of view 186–187

   and science 248

   as a literature of reality 177–179

   devices of 179–180

   fieldwork for 189,190–191

   finding a topic 189–190

   general writing strategies 179–183

   introductory structures for 181

   origins of 178

   qualities of accuracy and art 178

   range of 191–192

   speaking with the reader using 182

   subverting the structure of 181–182

   using experience to create 183–184

   using passion to create 183

   writing about people and the world 188–191

   writing about travel 192

   writing about yourself 183–188

   writing a memoir 185

   writing an investigation 190

   writing family history 189

   writing in scenes 189

creative writing

   and academic assessment 85–86

   and academic standards 82–86

   and business studies 242,249

   and composition 88–124

   and dangers of professionalism 14

   and freedom of expression 16, 48–49

   and interdisciplinarity 8,23,39,241

   and knowledge 2,28,37,38,183,187–188

   and memory 185,200

   and neural development 8–9,26–27,52,102,185,197

   and other art forms 19,23–24,42

   and rhetoric 17–19,76

   and science 28,242–243,245–246

   and the academy 16–17,30,85,241–247

   and the community 234–257

   and the media 82

   and the publishing industry 55–59,61,82

   and the self 1,7,46,142–153,212

   and tradition 19

   and value 156,197,211

   as a craft 81

   as a crossover discipline 243–245

   as an academic discipline 1–33,54,82,241–247,252

   challenges of 50,64–87,160

   course-creation 85,248

   distance learning 231

   doctoral programmes 163

creative writing (cont.)

   future developments for 252

   grassroots of 238–239

   in schools 238

   in self-development 3,143–153

   in the world 36–63,188–191,251

   learning 6–15

   possible disciplinary origins of 15–19

   processes of 125–154

   some principles of practice 88–93,112

   teaching 7–8,41–44,52,216,231

creativity 1–5,9,41

   physical activity promoting 103

critical realism 39

criticism 36–39

   and development of creative writing 20–21

   as a complement to creative writing 25,36,89

   as a negative influence on creative writers 21,38,40,67

   within a group of writers 56–57,117,121,122–123,134

Dante 73

   The Divine Comedy 73,85,254

Darwin, Charles 96

da Vinci, Leonardo 42,243

Dawkins, Richard 242

Dawson, Paul 7

daydreaming 97

deadlines 135–136

death 70,147

de Balzac, Honoré 158

defamiliarisation 9,90

de Maupassant, Guy 128,158

depression 143,146,152,249

de Vinsauf, Geoffrey 1,17

   Poetria Nova 1,17–18

diaries, learning 85

Dickens, Charles 50,149,217

Dickinson, Emily 30,110

dictionaries 103

difficulty 50–51

Dillard, Annie 32,69,174

Dinesen, Isak 158

discipline 69,95–99,129

   and indiscipline 97–99

   productive forms of 96–97,129

dissatisfaction 94

Donne, John 12,202

Douglas, Keith 178,180

   Alamein to Zem Zem 180

Douglass, Frederick 178

Dove, Rita 237

drafting 57,86,91,174–175,199,210–211

drama 16,18,109,217,221,248

dreams 2,45,100–101,163–165

duende 12,110

Dürer, Albrecht 89

economy 90,135

editing, close 210

editors 58

effacement 151

egoism 187

Einstein, Albert 20

eisteddfod 80

Eliot, George 151

Eliot, T. S. xvi,14,41,60,194,240

Empson, William 41

‘enemies of promise’, concept of 64

envy 67,70,99

essays, reflective 38,65,85

expectation, raising the level of 83

experience, writing from 40,44–45,47,153,184,212,242

   writing against your 47

experimental writing 74–78

failure 14,134–135,212

   addiction to 99

   importance of 68,69,134–135, 212

fantasy 31,54,67

Faulkner, William 45,158

Fenton, James 205

Feuchtwanger, Lion 73

fiction, practice of 155–176

   and conflict 166,173

   and verisimilitude 155,163,169

   as ‘storymaking’ 169–175

   beginnings 171–172

   character driving story 166,168

   character development 168,173

   character history 167–168

   dreaming a fictional continuum 163–165

   endings 175

   flash fiction 156–157

   form and structures for contemporary literary fiction 161–163

   narrative voice 170

   novel 159–160

   novella 159

   plotting 163–165

   point of view 169–171

   prewriting 167

   pros and cons of writing literary fiction 156–161

   research for 160,167

   rewriting 174–175

   setting 173–174

   scenes 163,165

   short story 157–158

   ‘storymaking or storytelling?’ 169

   time 173

   ‘what if?’ propositions 172–173

fieldwork 101–102,149,167,189,190–191

Finlay, Ian Hamilton 227

Flaubert, Gustave 9,97,148,174,209,234

fluency 98,129,131

Ford, Richard 157

form 78–81,91

   as a design tool 78–81

   as a restrictive device 70

   as elemental 80

   and fiction 161–163

   in poetry 203–207

   opposition to 81

   subversions of 162,206–207

Forster, E. M. 69

France, Anatole 5,210

Freed, Lynn 250

‘free verse’ 81,196,205

freewriting 105–106,119

Freud, Sigmund 54,152

Frost, Robert 15,41,72,80,200,202,208

Frye, Northrop 187

Fuentes, Carlos 30,235

Fussell, Paul 205

game-playing 76,80,110,128

Gardner, John 15,20,38,41,43,90,160,163,166

genius 92

Gibson, William 94

Gide, Andre 106

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang 42

Graves, Robert 198

Greene, Graham 96

Gunn, Thom 41

Gutkind, Lee 183

Hall, Donald 22,210

hallucinations, auditory 26,27

Hardy, Thomas 102,166

Hawthorne, Nathaniel 158

Hazlitt, William 178

Heaney, Seamus 14,41,71,129

Heller, Joseph 49

Hemingway, Ernest 2,3,11,66,121,122–123,133,136,158

Herbert, George 12

Hill, Geoffrey 41

Hogg, James 147

Holub, Miroslav 23,49,246

Homer 166

honesty 69,90,120,140,144,152,186,187,211

Hopkins, Gerard Manley 12

hubris 44,164

Hughes, Ted 36,41,46,69,103,201

Hugo, Richard 4,194,197,234,236

   The Triggering Town 194,212

humiliation, writing from 47

humility 47

Hunt, Celia 85,187

hypertext 229

idealism 43,69

imagination 8,45,91,142,160,167,243

imitation 32,73,91,113–114

incubation see writing, incubation before

indifference 64,65,134,147

individuality 32

inevitability 50–51,79,90,120

influence, literary 32,89,91,113,187

in media res 128

insecurity 101,248,249

insincerity 81

inspiration 79,90,103,108–110

insularity 60

Internet 229

interviewing 39,185,190–191

Iowa Writer’s Workshop 16

James, Henry 7,159,166

Jarrell, Randall 41

Jennings, Elizabeth 212

Johnson, B. S. 226

Jones, Russell Celyn 249

Jonson, Ben 16,22,41

jokes, structure of 81

journalism 67,135

Joyce, James 60,158,166,228

Kafka, Franz 15,159

Keats, John vii,21,41,51,68,76,106,125,146,187,194

kennings 6,199

King, Stephen 32,69,159,164,174

Kinzie, Mary 28,65,217

   and concept of kitsch 65,164

Koch, Kenneth 54,199,226,239

Koestler, Arthur 30,44

Kumin, Maxine 237

Kundera, Milan 160

Lamb, Charles 178

language

   ‘abstract versus concrete’ 91,113

   and meaning 72,200–203

   as a natural force 51,94–95,134,140,194,251

   early interest in 90

   evolution of 6,48,72,110,199

   misappropriation of 48,156,211,248

   sound of 25,26–28,72,81,140,194,195

   using scientific 138–140,151,241

Lawrence, D. H. 205,254

Lear, Edward 202,207

‘learned helplessness’ 99,102

Le Guin, Ursula 134,171,174

Lessing, Doris 59

Levertov, Denise 200,209

Lewis, Sinclair 48

Lewis, Wyndham 60

life

   as a fiction 67,137,143,184,236

   changing your 152–153

   exercising discipline in 69

   work–life balance 43,69–70,71

   writing from 101–102,183–184

line, the poetic 72,195,196,209

listening

   to language 194–198,220,251

   to music 27,223–224

lists, reading 33

‘literary apprenticeship’, concept of 11–12,113

Litt, Toby 165

Lodge, David 7,169

Logan, William 138

logbooks 86

Lopez, Barry 177,188,191,236

Lorca, Federico Garcia 12,110

lore, using 46,139,165

love 4,47

Lovejoy, Margot 230

Lowell, Robert 73,209

Machado, Antonio 74

McCullers, Carson 159

McEwan, Ian 67,163,236

MacLeish, Archibald 201

Mahon, Derek 198

‘makar’, concept of 19

Mamet, David 248

Mandelstam, Nadezhda 26,29

Mandelstam, Osip 26,29,182

   Journey to Armenia 182

manifestos, literary 75

Mann, Thomas 159

Mansfield, Katherine 93,158

marketplace, the literary 30,59,82,155,157

Marquez, Gabriel Garcia 158

Marx, Groucho 48

mathematics 40,52,76

   and the natural world 2,52,246

   writing using concepts from 52,75,79,139

Maugham, Somerset 50

media, rival 65

Melville, Hermanmemoir 185

memorisation 27,28,209

metaphor 9,10,245

‘method writing’ 150

metre 80

   poetic 194–198

metres, Welsh 80

Michelangelo 89

Middlemarch 85

Milne, A. A. 244

Milton, John 18

money, writing for 42,99,198

Moore, Alan 68,226

Moore, Marianne 5,138,206,212

Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus 42,122

   and the Salieri complex 122

Muldoon, Paul 41,94,114

Murdoch, Iris 56

Murray, Les 41,107,108,141,163,245

myth, using 46,165

Nabokov, Vladimir 66,177

names 138–140

‘negative capability’ 21,106,146

Neruda, Pablo 203

networking 56,116

Nobel Prize 84

nonfiction 25

notebooks 45,99–101,137,167,187,191

Oates, Joyce Carol 129,234,235,255

objectivity 40,151

obsessiveness 92,136

O’Connor, Flannery 22

O’Connor, Frank 134

O’Hara, Frank 38

Olsen, Tillie 64

   Silences 64,86,240

originality 6,25,26,32

Orwell, George 41,49,67,110,151,155,159,178

   ‘Politics and the English Language’ 49,112,122

Other, the 146–147,148

OuLiPo, the (Ouvroir de littérature potentielle) 23,74–78,230

overconfidence 69

over-writing 93–94

Ozick, Cynthia 15,29,46,66

Packard, William 250

‘pagefright’, concept of 68

panic 99,134

Paris Review 61

parody 28,73,113

passion 12,92,183

Pasternak, Boris 12

pastiche 73

Paterson, Don 74,157

PEN, International 49

Perec, Georges 75

perfectionism 67,69,143

performing writing 215–233

   and audiences for live literature 216–218

   as a conceptual art form 225

   as an oral art form 216

   as a public art form 227–229

   as a visual art form 226–227

   as literature promotion 216,220

   collaborative performance 230

   in a Mushairas 216,224

   ‘preaching to the converted’ 218

   reading techniques 221–225

   speaking and performing in public 215–218

   subversions 226

   types of venue for live literature 218

   using acting and actors 217,221

   using music 223–224

   voice work for live literature 218–220

persona 150–151

Pessoa, Fernando 150

Perutz, Max 242,246

phrase-making 110

Pinker, Steven 242

‘placebo-writing’ 146

plagiarism 73

Plath, Sylvia 200

Plato 16

play, writing using 14,49–50,52,68,76,119

plotting 163–165

Poe, Edgar Allan 157,158

poems, writing 134,194–214

   adapting your own experience for 212

   addresses for 202–203

   alliteration 196

   and formal design 203–208

   and poets 125,199,211–213

   and qualities of language 194,199,200–203

   and slams 18,212,216

   and song 194,196

   and translation 73

   available strategies for 208

   finding the language for 198–200

   ‘found poems’ 140,209–210

   free verse 196,205

   iambic pentameter 195

   metre 194–198

   practising several modes of 208–211

   problems in writing poems 203

   repetition devices 197

   rewriting poems 199,210–211

   rhyme 196–197

   sequences and collections 207

   ‘strangeness’ of poetry 201

   subjects for 202

   subverting form of poems 206–207

   syllabics 195,205–206

   teaching the techniques of 197

poetics, developing a 37

politics 48,52,67

posing 32,72

Pound, Ezra 21,38,41,60,74,90

precision 136–141,210

   and voice 140,211

pre-writing, concept of 167

Pritchett, V. S. 41,94

process, creative 22,39,55,70,91,125–154

‘promise’, concept of 64,71

publishing 55–61,83,120

   and the small presses 58,59–61

   as business 55

   etiquette of 57

   on demand 230

   pragmatics of 61

Pullman, Philip 11,156,171,173

punctuation 110

Pushkin, Vladimir 158

Queneau, Raymond 75,76,226

   Exercises in Style 76

readers 2,7

   as writers 7

reading 25–33

   aloud 27,83,120,133,209

   and fashion 29–30,82

   and learning to write 31–33,159,208

   and taste 30–31,33,208

   as a writer 39–40,90

   creative 26,28–29

   for instruction 187,209,236

reality 45,177

receptivity 131

recognition 30,55

Redmond, John 80,202

Reed, Henry 49

repetition 80

research 39,68,101

   for creative nonfiction 125

   for fiction 125,160,167

   for writing 25,44,99

reviewing 37,67

revising see drafting

rewriting 133–134,135,199,210

rhyme 72,80,194–197,198

   as a design tool 79

   full-rhyme 196

   half-rhyme 197

   nursery 80

rhythm 194

   as a mnemonic device 80,194

Rich, Adrienne 41

Rilke, Rainer Maria 152,254

Rimbaud, Arthur 147

risk-taking 43,68,113,143

Rodin, Auguste 42

Roethke, Theodore 203

Rose, Steven 242

Rowling, J. K. 156,240

Royal Literary Fund 244

rule-breaking 92

Ruskin, John 83,178

ruthlessness 91,97,148

Said, Edward 70

Sand, George 151

Schlovsky, Viktor 175

Schmidt, Michael 60

School of Wildness, the 20–21,119

Schuyler, James 100

science 40,140,151,189

   popular 25,54,182,241–242

   using the language of 54,241

Scott, Walter 151

self-belief 15,142–143

self-consciousness 13,79,142–143

self-doubt 69

self-importance 13

self-pity 46

sentimentality 65–66,164,203

serendipity 77,127

Shakespeare, William 20,109,138,148,217

‘shelf-life’ 71

Shelley, Mary 119

   and the writing of Frankenstein 119

Shelley, Percy Bysshe 9,41,90,119

   A Defence of Poetry 90

‘showing not telling’ 166,197

Sidney, Sir Philip 41

Sinclair, John D. 73

silence, and writing 72,74

simile 245

simplicity 140

Smart, Christopher 202

Smith, William Jay 251

Socrates 28

speech, qualities of human 27,101, 195

Spiegelman, Art 184

spontaneity 66

Steinbeck, John 129,132

Stevens, Wallace 212

story 8,155,246

storytelling 31,80,169

Stravinsky, Igor 92

style 90,93

   using a variety 77,114

subjectivity 40,46,85

success 33,67

   as a relative value in writing 155, 198

suicide 74,152

syllabics 138,195,205–206

syntax 110,144

Szymborska, Wisawa 199

talent 8,11,12,24,36–63,132

talking, hazards of 66–67

teaching

   as anti-creative 43

   as a performance art 216

   by distance learning 231

   motivations for 42

theme 38,119,166

theory, literary 38

thesauri 103

Thiong’o, Ngugi wa 41,73

Thomas, Dylan 79,202

Thomas, Edward 146

Thoreau, Henry David 31,66,178,180

   Walden, or Life in the Woods 180

thought-experiments 77,119,147,244

titles 132–133

Tolkien, J. R. R. 13

transaesthetics 230

translation 72–74

   and fabrication 74

   and imitation 73

   and ‘otherness’ 72,74,146

   and poetry 73

   and the practice of variation 73

   as a creative act 72

   as a cure for writer’s block 72,146

   as adaptation 73

   as a form of stealing 72–73,113

   challenges of 72–74

truth 46,90,137,144,169,202,236

Turgenev, Ivan 158

Turner, Mark 8

Two Cultures, the 241

‘unlearning’, concept of 93,208

‘unreliable narrator’ 168

Updike, John 156

Valéry, Paul 194,201

Van Gogh, Vincent 9

visualisation 10

vocation 11,12–13,22,212

voice 10,72,91,140,143–144

   ‘finding a voice’ 144

Vonnegut, Kurt 181

Walcott, Derek 114

Wallace, Robert 50,196

walking 103

weblogs 67,229,230–231

Wells, H. G. 61

Welty, Eudora 155,167

Whitman, Walt 202

Wilbur, Richard 196

Wilde, Oscar 201

Williams, William Carlos 12,234

Wilmot, John, Earl of Rochester 202

Wilson, Jacqueline 156

Winterson, Jeanette 247

Wolfe, Tom 178

Wolff, Tobias 127,135,235

Wood, James 175

Woolf, Virginia 41,60,64,129,159,178

   and The Hogarth Press 60

   ‘A Room of One’s Own’ 64,65,86,151

‘word-blindness’, concept of 68

words, meaning and history of 200

Wordsworth, Dorothy 178

Wordsworth, William 103

work, physical 43,46

Wright, C. D. 48

writers 136

   character of 5,11,31,69,91,97,126,143,212

   reputations of 82

‘Writing Across the Curriculum’ 244

writer’s block 72,102,108

writing:

   about people and the world 188–191,236–238

   about yourself 183–188

   and ageing 70

   and belief 7,13

   and chance 26,52,77,111,127

   and childhood 15,54,80,81,105,197

   and choosing a genre 126

   and confidence 141–143,171

   and confusion 95,142

   and design 78–81,203–208

   and ‘flow’ 129–130

   and friendship 56,115

   and identity 114,254

   and impersonality 136,146,151

   and intuition 126,160,246

   and playfulness 14,77,208–211

   and pleasure 4,49,54–55,238

   and possibility 78,111,128,142,162,211,239

   and silence 72,74,131

   and surprise 79,92,110,127,164,194

   as a form of teaching 42–43,216

   avoiding 66,108,142

   badly 91,93,210

   beginning a piece of 128

   creative nonfiction 177–193

   demystifying the processes of 5,15

   electronic forms of 229–232

   fiction 155–176

   finding a rhythm for 4–5,70,96,129

   finishing 131–132,133

   for yourself 15,25,39,90,160,192,235

   ideas for 45,242

   improving skill at 52,57,68,131

   in different states of mind 143–153

   in performance 215–233

   in persona 150–151

   in the community 234–257

   in your ‘zone’ 104–105,126,129

   incubation before 127–128,202

   literary 93,160

   material for 46,101

   on ‘nothingness’ 46

   permutations of choice during 75,110,162,175,208

   planning as part of the process of 127

   poems 194–214

   preparation for 125–126

   processes of 125–154

   props and prompts for 103–104,136

   reasons and motivations for 3–4,14–15,25,38,95,211–213

   reasons for not writing 32,142

   rituals for creating the best conditions for 102–106

   talking away your writing 66–67

   tools for 99

   using heteronyms to assist with 150–151

‘writing cold’ 152

Writing Games xiv,68,163,244

   rationales for xiv,163,242

‘Writing in the Disciplines’ 244

Writing Programmes 6,59,115

‘writing what you know’ 34,45–47,91,183–184,189

writing workshops 56–57,115–123,134,169

   and the danger of homogeneity 118

   ‘generative’ 118–120

   hazards of 121–122

   human dynamics in 117,122

   improvising writing in 119,129,130

   origins of 16,116

   purposes of 115

   ‘Responsive’ 118,120–123

   setting up an online workshop 231–232

Yeats, William Butler 97

‘youth-envy’ 70

Zinsser, William 179,18

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