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The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages

Details

  • 115 tables
  • Page extent: 888 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 1.5 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 440.09
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: PC45 .C245 2011
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Romance languages--History
    • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General--bisacsh

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521800723)

The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages
Cambridge University Press
9780521800723 - The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages - Structures - Edited by Martin Maiden,, John Charles Smith and Adam Ledgeway
Frontmatter/Prelims

The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages

This Cambridge History is the most comprehensive survey of the history of the Romance languages ever published in English, offering major and original insights into the subject. Informed by the latest advances in Romance linguistics and general linguistic theory, it engages with new and original topics that reflect wider-ranging comparative concerns, such as the relation between diachrony and synchrony; morphophonological persistence; form–function relationships; morphosyntactic typology; pragmatic change; the structure of written Romance; and lexical stability.

Volume I is organized around the two key recurrent themes of persistence (structural inheritance and continuity from Latin) and innovation (structural change and loss in Romance). An important and novel aspect of the volume is that it accords persistence in Romance a focus in its own right rather than treating it simply as the background to the study of change. At the same time, it explores in depth the patterns of innovation (including loss) at all linguistic levels. The result is a rich structural history which marries together data and theory to produce new perspectives on the structural evolution of the Romance languages.

Martin Maiden is Professor of the Romance Languages and Director of the Research Centre for Romance Linguistics at the University of Oxford. He is also a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, and a Fellow of the British Academy. His recent publications include A Reference Grammar of Modern Italian (with Cecilia Robustelli, 2007).

John Charles Smith is Faculty Lecturer in French Linguistics and Deputy Director of the Research Centre for Romance Linguistics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St Catherine’s College, Oxford. He has published widely on agreement, refunctionalization, deixis, and the evolution of case and pronoun systems, with particular reference to Romance.

Adam Ledgeway is Head of the Department of Italian and Senior Lecturer in Romance Philology at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Downing College, Cambridge. His recent publications include Grammatica diacronica del napoletano (2009).


The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages

Structures

Edited by

Martin Maiden,, John Charles Smith and Adam Ledgeway


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521800723

© Cambridge University Press 2011

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2011

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

The Cambridge history of the Romance languages / edited by Martin Maiden,
John Charles Smith, and Adam Ledgeway.
v. cm.
Contents: v. 1. Structures – v. Context.
ISBN 978-0-521-80072-3 (hardback)
1. Romance languages – History. I. Maiden, Martin, 1957– II. Smith,
John Charles, 1950– III. Ledgeway, Adam. IV. Title.
PC45.C245 2010
440.09–dc22
2010039944

ISBN 978-0-521-80072-3 Hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


In memoriam

Joseph A. Cremona 1922–2003


Contents

List of contributors
ix
List of abbreviations
x
Introduction
xvii
1     Romance linguistics and historical linguistics: reflections on synchrony and diachrony
Rosanna Sornicola
1
2     Syllable, segment and prosody
Michele Loporcaro
50
3     Phonological processes
Michele Loporcaro
109
4     Morphological persistence
Martin Maiden
155
5     Morphophonological innovation
Martin Maiden
216
6     Change and continuity in form–function relationships
John Charles Smith
268
7     Morphosyntactic persistence
Giampaolo Salvi
318
8     Syntactic and morphosyntactic typology and change
Adam Ledgeway
382
9     Pragmatic and discourse changes
Maria M. Manoliu
472
10    Word formation
Brigitte L. M. Bauer
532
11    Lexical stability
Arnulf Stefenelli
564
12    Lexical change
Steven N. Dworkin
585
13    Latin and the structure of written Romance
Christopher J. Pountain
606
14    Slang and jargons
John Trumper
660
Notes
682
References and bibliographical abbreviations
746
Index
842

Contributors

Brigitte L. M. Bauer

Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

Steven N. Dworkin

Professor of Romance Languages and Linguistics, University of Michigan

Adam Ledgeway

Senior Lecturer in Romance Philology and Head of the Department of Italian,
University of Cambridge

Michele Loporcaro

Professor of Romance Linguistics, Romanisches Seminar, Universität Zürich

Martin Maiden

Professor of the Romance Languages and Director of the Research Centre for Romance Linguistics, University of Oxford

Maria M. Manoliu

Professor Emeritus, University of California

Christopher John Pountain

Professor of Spanish Linguistics, Queen Mary, University of London

Giampaolo Salvi

Professor of Romance Linguistics, Eötvös Loránd University

John Charles Smith

Faculty Lecturer in French Linguistics, Deputy Director of the Research Centre for Romance Linguistics and Fellow of St Catherine’s College, University of Oxford

Rosanna Sornicola

Professore Ordinario di Linguistica Generale, Università di Napoli Federico II

Arnulf Stefenelli

John Trumper

Professor of Linguistics, Università della Calabria


Abbreviations

Bibliographical abbreviations will be found under References, at the end of this volume.
*

unattested form or usage

**

ungrammatical form or usage

%

marginal form or usage

?

dubious form or usage; when used alone, form uncertain or unknown

??

highly dubious form or usage

=

cliticized to

$

syllable boundary

Ø

null argument (subject or object)

1

first person

1CONJ

first conjugation

1SW

one-syllable window

2

second person

2CONJ

second conjugation

2SW

two-syllable window

3

third person

3CONJ

third conjugation

3SW

three-syllable window

4CONJ

fourth conjugation

A

(i) adjective position (head of AP); (ii) subject of a transitive clause

ABL

ablative

Abr.

Abruzzese

Aca.

Acadian (French)

ACC

accusative




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