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Too Smart for our Own Good

Details

  • 60 b/w illus. 2 tables
  • Page extent: 546 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 1.07 kg

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521757690)

Too Smart for Our Own Good
Cambridge University Press
9780521764360 - Too Smart for Our Own Good - The Ecological Predicament of Humankind - By Craig Dilworth
Table of Contents

Contents

List of figures and tables
xii
Preface
xv
Introduction
1
1       Scientific ground rules
3
Principles of physics, chemistry and biology
3
Physical and biological systems
10
Genetics and homeostasis
16
2       The new views in anthropology, archaeology and economics
50
Anthropology
52
Archaeology
75
Economics
91
3       Theoretical background to the vicious circle principle
99
The principle of population
99
Different kinds of population check
102
Population growth pushes technology
105
Ecological equilibrium, technological/economic development and economic growth
107
4       The vicious circle principle of the development of humankind
109
Presentation of the vicious circle principle
109
Explication of the vicious circle principle
113
Conclusion
167
5       The development of humankind
168
Apes and protohominids 7 million bp
168
The first hominids: Australopithecus 4 million bp
172
The first humans 2.5 million bp
183
The Neanderthals 230,000 bp
190
The Upper Palaeolithic in Europe 40,000 bp
199
The latter half of the Upper Palaeolithic in Europe 25,000 bp
207
The Palaeolithic–Mesolithic transformation 12,000 bp
212
VCP analysis of the hunter-gatherer era
218
VCP models of increasing complexity
232
The hunter-gatherer model
233
The horticultural (domestication) revolution 10,000 bp
234
VCP analysis of the horticultural era
247
The horticultural model
268
Mining metals 6000 bp
269
The agrarian (plough and irrigation) revolution 5000 bp
272
Colonisation and the (capitalistic) mercantile expansion 1500 ad
294
VCP analysis of the agrarian era
297
The agrarian model
308
The (capitalistic) industrial (fossil-fuel) revolution 1750 ad
310
VCP analysis of the industrial age
327
The industrial model
354
6       The vicious circle today
356
Our use of minerals
356
Biotic consumption
359
Pollution
370
Extinctions
373
Population growth and checks; morals
373
Migration
374
Power begets more power: capitalism
375
The Third World
376
Global military spending and war
383
Economic growth
386
Disease
387
The 1950s–1960s peak and the subsequent lowering of the quality of life of the middle class
389
7       … and too dumb to change
393
Perspectives and worldviews
396
Planning
398
The pursuit of economic growth
399
Innovation
415
Nuclear energy
416
Agriculture
418
Medicine
426
Resource depletion
431
Pollution
435
Energy conservation
436
Alternative sources of energy
437
Population growth
437
Conflict
440
The Third World
445
Overshoot and the ecological revolution
451
Conclusion
453
Glossary
455
Notes
468
References
499
Index
517



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