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Cognitive Neurorehabilitation

Details

  • 36 b/w illus. 20 colour illus. 22 tables
  • Page extent: 620 pages
  • Size: 246 x 189 mm
  • Weight: 1.35 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: n/a
  • Dewey version: n/a
  • LC Classification: RC553.C64 C654 2008
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Cognition disorders--Patients--Rehabilitation
    • Brain damage--Patients--Rehabilitation

Library of Congress Record

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521691857)

Cognitive Neurorehabilitation
Cambridge University Press
9780521871334 - Cognitive Neurorehabilitation - Evidence and Application - Edited by Donald T. Stuss, Gordon Winocur and Ian H. Robertson
Frontmatter/Prelims

Cognitive Neurorehabilitation, Second Edition: Evidence and Application


Cognitive Neurorehabilitation

Evidence and Application

Second Edition

Edited by

Donald T. Stuss, Gordon Winocur and Ian H. Robertson


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521871334

© Cambridge University Press 2008

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First edition © Cambridge University Press 1999
This edition published 2008

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library

ISBN 978-0-521-87133-4 hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.

Every effort has been made in preparing this publication to provide accurate and up-to-date information which is in accord with accepted standards and practice at the time of publication. Although case histories are drawn from actual cases, every effort has been made to disguise the identities of the individuals involved. Nevertheless, the authors, editors and publishers can make no warranties that the information contained herein is totally free from error, not least because clinical standards are constantly changing through research and regulation. The authors, editors and publishers therefore disclaim all liability for direct or consequential damages resulting from the use of material contained in this publication. Readers are strongly advised to pay careful attention to information provided by the manufacturer of any drugs or equipment that they plan to use.


Contents

List of Contributors
ix
Preface
xv
Section 1 Principles of cognitive neurorehabilitation
1
1.        Principles of neuroplasticity and behavior
Bryan Kolb and Robbin Gibb
6
2.        Principles of compensation in cognitive neuroscience and neurorehabilitation
Roger A. Dixon, Douglas D. Garrett and Lars Bäckman
22
3.        The patient as a moving target: the importance to rehabilitation of understanding variability
Donald T. Stuss and Malcolm A. Binns
39
4.        Hormones and allostasis in brain disease and repair
Richard G. Hunter and Bruce S. McEwen
62
5.        Principles in conducting rehabilitation research
Amy D. Rodriguez and Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi
79
6.        Outcome measurement in cognitive neurorehabilitation
Nadina Lincoln and Roshan das Nair
91
7.        Principles in evaluating cognitive rehabilitation research
Keith D. Cicerone
106
Section 2 Application of imaging technologies
119
8.        Structural neuroimaging: defining the cerebral context for cognitive rehabilitation
Joel Ramirez, Fu Qiang Gao and Sandra E. Black
124
9.        Functional neuroimaging and cognitive rehabilitation: healthy aging as a model of plasticity
Cheryl L. Grady
149
10.       Functional brain imaging and neurological recovery
Maurizio Corbetta
162
11.       The role of neuroelectric and neuromagnetic recordings in assessing learning and rehabilitation effects
Claude Alain and Bernhard Ross
182
Section 3 Factors affecting successful outcome
201
12.       Mood, affect and motivation in rehabilitation
Omar Ghaffar and Anthony Feinstein
205
13.       Anosognosia and the process and outcome of neurorehabilitation
George P. Prigatano
218
14.       Psychosocial considerations in cognitive rehabilitation
Deirdre R. Dawson and Gordon Winocur
232
15.       Exercise, cognition and dementia
Erik Scherder and Laura Eggermont
250
16.       Is there a role for diet in cognitive rehabilitation?
Matthew Parrott and Carol Greenwood
272
Section 4 Pharmacologic and biological approaches
293
17.       Pharmacologic approaches to cognitive rehabilitation
Thomas W. McAllister and Amy F. T. Arnsten
298
18.       Pharmacologic treatment of cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury
John Whyte
321
19.       Pharmacologic interventions for cognition in dementia
John M. Ringman and Jeffrey L. Cummings
334
20.       Neurogenesis-based regeneration and cognitive therapy in the adult brain. Is it feasible?
J. Martin Wojtowicz
348
21.       The impact of cerebral small vessel disease on cognitive impairment and rehabilitation
Harry V. Vinters and S. Thomas Carmichael
360
22.       Intrinsic and extrinsic neural stem cell treatment of central nervous system injury and disease
Trudi Stickland, Samuel Weiss and Bryan Kolb
376
Section 5 Behavioral/neuropsychological approaches
395
23.       The use of constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) to promote motor recovery following stroke
David M. Morris and Edward Taub
401
24.       Effects of physical activity on cognition and brain
Arthur F. Kramer, Kirk I. Erickson and Edward McAuley
417
25.       Aphasia
Susan A. Leon, Stephen E. Nadeau, Michael deRiesthal, Bruce Crosson, John C. Rosenbek and Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi
435
26.       Rehabilitation of neglect
Victoria Singh-Curry and Masud Husain
449
27.       Rehabilitation of frontal lobe functions
Brian Levine, Gary R. Turner and Donald T. Stuss
464
28.       Executive functioning in children with traumatic brain injury in comparison to developmental ADHD
Gerri Hanten and Harvey S. Levin
487
29.       Rehabilitation of attention following traumatic brain injury
Jennie Ponsford
507
30.       Memory rehabilitation for people with brain injury
Barbara A. Wilson and Narinder Kapur
522
31.       Memory rehabilitation in older adults
Elizabeth L. Glisky and Martha L. Glisky
541
Section 6 Overview
563
32.       The future of cognitive neurorehabilitation
Ian H. Robertson and Susan M. Fitzpatrick
565
Index
575

Contributors

Claude Alain

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Amy F. T. Arnsten

Department of Neurobiology,
Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT, USA

Lars Bäckman

Karolinska Institute,
Stockholm, Sweden

Malcolm A. Binns

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Sandra E. Black

Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery
LC Campbell Cognitive Neurology Research Unit
Sunnybrook Research Institute
Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest
Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine,
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

S. Thomas Carmichael

Program in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair,
Department of Neurology,
David Geffen School of Medicine,
University of California,
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Keith D. Cicerone

Department of Neuropsychology,
JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute,
Edison, NJ, USA

Maurizio Corbetta

Department of Neurology, Radiology, Anatomy and Neurobiology,
Washington University School of Medicine,
St. Louis, MO, USA

Bruce Crosson

VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, and
Department of Clinical and Health Psychology,
University of Florida Health Science Center,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Jeffrey L. Cummings

UCLA Alzheimer’s Disease Center,
University of California,
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Deirdre R. Dawson

Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Michael deRiesthal

VA Medical Center,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Roger A. Dixon

Department of Psychology,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB, Canada

Laura Eggermont

Department of Clinical Neuropsychology,
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Kirk I. Erickson

Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology,
University of Illinois,
Urbana, IL, USA

Anthony Feinstein

Neuropsychiatry Program,
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Susan M. Fitzpatrick

James S. McDonnell Foundation,
St. Louis, MO, USA

Fu Qiang Gao

Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery,
LC Campbell Cognitive Neurology Research Unit,
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Douglas D. Garrett

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
Department of Psychology,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Omar Ghaffar

Neuropsychiatry Program,
Department of Psychiatry,
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Robbin Gibb

Department of Neuroscience,
Canadian Centre for Behavioral Neuroscience,
University of Lethbridge,
Lethbridge, AB, Canada

Elizabeth L. Glisky

Department of Psychology,
University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ, USA

Martha L. Glisky

Evergreen Hospital Medical Center,
Kirkland, WA, USA

Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi

VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Cheryl L. Grady

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Carol Greenwood

Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Gerri Hanten

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,
Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX, USA

Richard G. Hunter

Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology,
The Rockefeller University,
New York, NY, USA

Masud Husain

Institute of Neurology and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience,
University College London,
London, UK

Narinder Kapur

Addenbrooke’s Hospital,
Cambridge, UK

Bryan Kolb

Canadian Centre for Behavioral Neuroscience,
University of Lethbridge,
Lethbridge, AB, Canada

Arthur F. Kramer

Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology,
University of Illinois,
Urbana, IL, USA

Susan A. Leon

VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Harvey S. Levin

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,
Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX, USA

Brian Levine

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Nadina Lincoln

Institute of Work Health and Organisations,
University of Nottingham,
Nottingham, UK

Thomas W. McAllister

Department of Psychiatry,
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center,
Lebanon, NH, USA

Edward McAuley

Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
University of Illinois
Urbana, IL
USA

Bruce S. McEwen

Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology,
The Rockefeller University,
New York, NY, USA

David M. Morris

Department of Physical Therapy,
University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, AL, USA

Stephen E. Nadeau

Brain Rehabilitation Research Center,
Malcolm Randall DVA Medical Center,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Roshan das Nair

School of Psychology,
University of Nottingham,
Nottingham, UK

Matthew Parrott

Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit,
Baycrest,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Jennie Ponsford

School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine,
Monash University,
Clayton, Victoria, Australia

George P. Prigatano

Barrow Neurological Institute,
St. Joseph’s Hospital − CHW,
Phoenix, AZ, USA

Joel Ramirez

LC Campbell Cognitive Neurology Research Unit,
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
Toronto, ON, Canada

John M. Ringman

UCLA Alzheimer’s Disease Center,
University of California,
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Ian H. Robertson

Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, and
School of Psychology,
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Amy D. Rodriguez

Department of Communicative Disorders,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, USA

John C. Rosenbek

Department of Communicative Disorders,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, USA

Bernhard Ross

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Erik Scherder

Department of Clinical Neuropsychology,
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and
Institute of Human Movement Sciences,
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands

Victoria Singh-Curry

Institute of Neurology and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience,
University College London,
London, UK

Trudi Stickland

Hotchkiss Brain Institute,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB, Canada

Donald T. Stuss

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Edward Taub

Department of Psychology,
University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, AL, USA

Gary R. Turner

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Harry V. Vinters

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Neuropathology),
UCLA Medical Center,
University of California,
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Samuel Weiss

Hotchkiss Brain Institute,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB, Canada

John Whyte

Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute,
Elkins Park, PA, and
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,
Thomas Jefferson University,
Philadelphia, PA, USA

Barbara A. Wilson

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit,
Cambridge, UK

Gordon Winocur

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada

J. Martin Wojtowicz

Department of Physiology,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada




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