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Employment Relationships

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  • 12 tables
  • Page extent: 276 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.45 kg

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 (ISBN-13: 9780521684088)

Employment Relationships

Cambridge University Press
9780521865371 - Employment Relationships - New Models of White-Collar Work - Edited by Peter Cappelli
Index


Index

Abbott, A. 224

Abraham, K. G. 78

acting, surface and deep 127, 128, 134–5

Akin Gump 211

Albert, S. 182, 183

Allen, S. G. 34

American Management Association (AMA) 7

Angel, Anthony 189

anger 130, 133, 135

Arrow, K. 70

Association of Executive Search Consultants 19


Bain, P. 114, 123, 131

Barley, S. R. 168, 225, 226

Barney, J. 205, 209

Batt, R. 114, 119

Becker, B. E. 74

Becker, G. 69, 208

Becker, H. 226

Beldt, Sandra 6

Belford, T. 213

Bell, D. 225

Benner, C. 16

Bidwell, Matthew 148–78

Bielby, D. D. 175

Bielby, W. T. 175

BlueSteps 19

Boeker, W. 207

Bonowitz, Sheldon 206

Bradford Hildebrandt 196

Braverman, P. 202

breaks in service 81, 91, 94, 105

Brill, S. 187, 202

Briscoe, Forrest 26, 223–40

Broschack, J. 225

Brown, J. 210, 211, 212

Brown, J. N. 72

Buchanan Ingersoll 211

bureaucracy 26, 62

   benefits for professional careers 223–40

   and career flexibility 223, 241–3, 248

   and client handoffs 241–4

   and workforce changes 231

business stragety theory 180, 182, 197, 213

Business Week rankings 183

Butler, Samuel 201


Cadwalader Wickersham 204

call center workers 124–33

   absences 130, 138

   autonomy of 127, 134

   burnout 125, 130, 132, 134

   effects of customers on 129–31, 135–6

   interpersonal demands on 115, 124, 125–9, 133, 136

   job satisfaction 148

   knowledge and skills 74–5, 124–5

   mobility of 137

   numbers of 113

   self-regulation of emotions 127, 128, 137

   specialization 119, 120

   stress on 112, 115, 127, 131, 136, 137, 138

call centers 26, 112–24

   anger 130, 133, 135

   authenticity versus faking 127–9, 134–5

   automatic call distribution systems 120

   categories of quality 123

   cold calls 116

   competition between quality and quantity in 112–25

   complexity of calls 115

   control of work 115, 123, 125, 127, 129, 131, 133, 134, 135, 138

   customer service orientation 118

   customers’ attitudes 129–31, 135–6

   customization versus conformity 126–7

   design of jobs in 114, 120

   efficiency and 113

   and factories 114–15, 133, 138

   ‘first call resolution’ 126

   and globalization 136–8

   high-involvement practices 119

   inbound and outbound calls 116–17

   interpersonal context in 129–33, 138

   length of calls 117, 120

   market segmentation 119–20

   monitoring systems 114, 118, 122, 123, 131

   pacing systems 114, 120–2, 123, 133

   performance management systems 131

   queuing of calls 121–2

   reliance on technology 115, 131, 133

   routing of calls in 119–20

   sales calls and service calls 117–18

   scripting 122, 123

   self-managed teams 132

   skill types and levels 115, 118, 137

   standardization of processes in 126

   supervisors’ roles 131–2, 136

   technology in 118–24

   training 127, 134, 136

   turnover rates in 114, 116, 138

   types of calls and callers 116–18

   warm calls 117

   workers’ coping with competing demands in 124–33

   workers’ self-regulation of emotions 127, 128, 137

Cappelli, Peter 1–30, 34, 194, 195, 215

career flexibility 223, 231, 242, 245–8

   costs and benefits of 245–7, 247–8

careers 1, 5, 26, 61

   professional 226, 231

   theory of 248–9

Castilla, E. J. 132, 133

CEOs 11, 12

changing jobs, cost of 24

Chapman, C. S. 228

Chissick, C. 123, 131

Cisco Systems 17

Clark, R. L. 34

Cohen, H. Rodgin 203

Collins, D. 189, 190

compensation and benefits 84; see also salaries

competition 69

computer system services 145

contingent work 7, 147

contractors, independent 25, 195

Cool, K. 205

corporate recruiting firms 16, 19

Cowan, A. L. 196

Coyne, Erin 112

Cravath, Paul 195, 198

credentials, non-degree 15


Davis Polk 193, 201

decentralization 10, 35

demography, organizational 32, 37, 77

Dencker, John 25, 31–64

development programs 14, 24

Dickter, D. 130

Dierickx, I. 205

discrete-time event history methods 39, 47, 48, 56

discrimination 58, 69, 70–1, 146; see also, gender, race

division of labor 229, 232, 248

Doeringer, P. B. 208

Dokko, G. 137

downsizing 7–9

   causes of 8

   effect on employees 8

Drazen, R. 207

Duane Morris 204, 206, 209

Dukerich, J. M. 183

Dutton, J. E. 183


earnings, instability of 24

education 80, 91, 94, 99, 104

efficiency 113

Elsbach, K. E. 183

employee benefits 84, 173

employee stock options 86–7, 99, 105, 106

employees

   age 40, 78–80, 91, 94, 95

   attachment to the firm 12, 20–5

   autonomy of 127, 134, 207, 215, 226, 229, 231, 246

   breaks in service 81, 91, 94, 105

   education 80, 91, 94, 99

   empowerment of 10

   incentives to stay 85–7, 105

   internal development of 6, 11, 12, 14, 21

   mobility of 3, 62

   productivity of 80

   retention of 14

   stock options 105

   tenure 14, 20–3, 31, 34, 40, 43

employers

   investment in employees 67

   outsourcing for numerical flexibility 147

employment

   changing nature of the relationship 9, 20–5, 31

   history of the relationship 34–5

   instability in 22, 23, 24

   job structures 38, 59, 60

   lifetime 6, 7, 14, 33, 207

   market-based relationships 33, 53, 59, 61, 62, 145

   security of 7, 8, 9, 14, 26, 159

   stability in 20, 34

   triadic relationships 26

employment agencies 142, 143

employment separations 37, 65–105

   age and 79–80, 95

   breaks in service and 81

   and compensation 84

   costs to society 67

   data on 48, 72–4, 96–8, 102–4, 106

   definition of 66–8

   demand-side variables in 81–5, 101

   duration measures 49–50

   education and 80, 99

   empirical results of study on 95–100

   gender differences 39, 69–71, 82, 83–4

   involuntary separations 33, 60, 66, 67, 68, 75, 80, 85, 95, 100

   job family and 82, 99

   job level and 82–3, 99

   job structures and 51–3

   job tracks and 85

   layoffs 35

   and mobility 32

   performance ratings and 80–1, 99

   promotions and 77–89, 106

   race and 69–71, 82, 83–4

   reasons for 76, 100–1, 107–7

   restructuring and 43–53, 60

   retirement 75, 95, 98

   stock options and 99, 106

   study of 68–71, 90

   supply-side variables in 77–81, 101

   tenure and 78–9, 95

   trends in 75–7

   types of 49–50

   union status and 85, 99

   voluntary 35, 60, 66, 75, 80, 85, 95, 100, 106

employment services industry 16

Empson, L. 212, 228

Engel, G. 226

Epstein, C. F. 245

Eviatar, D. 209

Execunet Executive Job Market Intelligence 19


Farber, H. S. 67

Fergus, J. 200

Fernandez-Mateo, Isabel 146–78

firm, theory of 69

Fisk, G. 125, 127, 134

Fleischer-Black, M. 209, 211

Frankel, A. 201

Freeagent.com 19

Frei, R. 118

Frenkel, M. 126, 131

Fricano, John C. 201


Gall, G. 114, 123, 131

gender differences 39, 69–71, 74, 75, 78, 82, 83–4, 87–8, 91, 92–3, 104, 105

Gerhart, B. 74

glass ceiling 59

glass escalator 94

globalization 136–8

Grandey, A. 125, 127, 128, 130, 134

Greenberg and Traurig 204

Greenhaus, J. H. 89

Greenwood, R. 210, 211, 212, 228

Gudykunst, W. B. 74, 78


Hall, R. 226

Hallman, B. 207

Hamori, Monika 12

Hartmann, H. I. 73, 74

Hersch, J. 74

Hillman, R. W. 200

Hillmer, B. 138

Hillmer, S. 138

Hinings, C. R. 210, 211, 212

Hochschild, A. R. 127

Holman, D. J. 123, 128, 131, 135

human capital 6, 70, 77

human resource management systems 61, 180, 191–7, 207–8

   high-commitment 207

human resources management strategy 173, 182, 197, 213

Hunter, L. 114


industrial relations regulation 174

information, asymmetry of 224

information systems 10

information technology companies 15

institutional theory 182, 200

internal labor markets 34, 54, 60, 70, 157

isomorphism 197


Jansen, K. 134

Jensen, Frode III 210

job evaluation 24

job family 82, 91

job level 82–3, 105

job matching 78, 150

job structures 38, 51–3, 59, 60, 94

job tracks 85

Joffe, Robert 203

Jones Day 195

Jovanovic, B. 78


Kaplan, D. A. 199, 201, 206, 211

Karasz, Peter 203

Kewell, Donald 6

King, Henry L. 201, 206

Kirkland Ellis 204

Kletzer, L. 34

Kolker, C. 204, 206, 210

Koppel, N. 205, 206

Korczynski, M. 126, 131

Kraatz, M. S. 208

Kramer, R. M. 183

Kunda, G. 168


labor market intermediaries 16

labor markets 69, 174

   internal 34, 54, 60, 70, 157

   occupational

laws affecting employment 146

law firms, large 26, 179–204

   acquisition of lateral partners: see lateral acquisition of partners in large law firms

   associates 196, 212

   “Chinese walls” 213

   competitive advantage 190

   core and peripheral workforce 181, 191–2

   Cravath model of partners and associates 181, 192, 193, 198–9

   effects of two-tier wage system 194, 196

   employees versus independent contractors 195

   human resource management in 180, 181, 191–4, 197, 200–1, 215

   internal acquisition capabilities 208–14, 215

   internationalization of 186

   leverage ratio 185

   non-competition clauses 198

   organizational change 179

   organizational identity of 180, 181, 182, 215

   partnership 180, 187–9, 192, 196, 212, 228

   positional standing of 187

   profits and revenues 184

   profits per partner 184, 187–9, 196, 202

   research on 189–91, 195–7, 204, 213–14, 216

   size 184

   transition from partnership to business model 199–200

   “up or out” career paths 192–3

lateral acquisition of partners in large law firms 180, 182, 192, 197–204, 208–9, 215

   application and appropriation of 213, 214

   integration of 211–13, 214

   selection of 209–11, 214

   value of 204–14

   views on 206–7

Leblebici, H. 200

Lee, K. 200

Leidner, R. 126

Lennon, R. 203

Lepak, D. 191, 208

Lewin, T. 195

Light, A. 72

Lipton, Robert J. 206

Longstreeth, A. 201


managers 4

   career mobility patterns 32

   career patterns 53–9, 60

   changes in the labor force 42

   distribution of 42

   gender differences 57–9

   hiring conditions 53–4

   promotion rates 54–7

   separations 46

   women in management positions 61

manpower planning 2, 5, 6, 10, 11–20

Markov Chain analysis 3

Martindale-Hubbell Legal Directory 214

Mattila, A. 134

McCoy, Neal S. 201

McDaniel, M. 118

McKinsey and Company 3

McLaughlin, K. J. 85

McLean, R. Bruce 206

McRoberts, G. 138

medical services 26

Medoff, J. L 78

mergers and acquisitions 205, 208, 212, 213

   financial effects of 205–6

   organizational fit and 210, 211

Microsoft vs. Vizcaino case 146, 174

Milkovich, G. 74

Mincer, J. 78

Mintzberg, H. 226

Monster.com 18, 20

Moore, J. H. 208

Moore, P. 133

Moore, Thurston 209

Moynihan, L. 132

Mulvey, G. 114, 123, 131

Munichor, N. 121


National Law Journal 216

   Directory of the Legal Profession 199

Nelson, R. 179


Oliver, C. 197

Olson, C. A. 74

online job search 17–20

Opus360 19

organizational hierarchies, flattening of 65, 66

organizational theory 179–204

Orr, J. E. 225

outside hiring 11–17, 27

   at entry and lower levels 15–17

   at the executive level 12–14

outsourcing 8, 142

   reasons for 147


Parasuraman, S. 89

partnership 227–31

Pearce, J. 195, 196

pension plans 25; see also employee benefits

performance management systems 35–6, 38, 57, 131

performance ratings 53, 80–1, 88, 91, 99, 128

Petersen, T. 58

Phillips, D. J. 208, 214

physicians, primary care 226, 231–48

   administration work 236–7, 238, 241

   autonomy of 232

   career and organizations 234–5

   career flexibility 231, 235–41, 243–4, 245–8

   demands on time 234, 245

   electronic medical record systems 243

   extra-organizational roles 237–8

   full-time patient care 238, 239

   methods for study on 233

   non-traditional career activities 235, 239, 240

   part-time work 235–6, 238

   patient handoffs 241–4

   private partnerships 232

   relationship with patients 242, 243

   standardization of clinical work processes 241, 242

   women 232

Piore, M. J. 208

Porras, J. 189, 190

Powers, L. 232

preference and utility 69–70

professional employer organizations 145

professional organizations 231, 245

   bureaucracy in 228

   changes in 228–9

professional services 26, 143, 223–40

   career flexibility 244–5

   careers in 226

   definition of 224–7

professionalism 15

professionals

   attitudes 229

   autonomy of 231

   demographic makeup of 229–31

   and division of household labor 229, 232

   values 230, 231, 234

professions 227

   history of 225–7

   standardization of processes in 228

   study of 226

profit centers 10

promotions 4, 37, 65–105

   age and 79–80, 91, 94, 104, 105

   breaks in service and 81, 91, 94, 104, 105

   from within a company 1, 66

   correlates of 87–9

   data on 72–4

   demand-side variables in 81–5, 101

   education and 80, 91, 94, 104

   empirical results of study on 91–5

   employment separations and 106

   gender see gender

   impact on wage levels 65–6

   incentives to stay 85–7, 105

   job family and 82, 91

   job level and 82–3, 105

   job structure and 94

   job tracks and 85

   and performance rating 80–1

   performance ratings and 88, 91, 104

   policies of firms 68

   race and: see race

   salaries and 91, 104

   and separations 77–89

   stock options and 105

   study of 68–71

   supply-side variables in 77–81, 101

   tenure and 78–9, 91, 94, 104, 105

   trends in 74–5

   union status and 85, 105

   variables in study on 89

   and wage gain 91, 104


race 69–71, 74, 75, 82, 83–4, 87–8, 91, 92–3, 104, 105

racial minorities 69, 107

   cost of hiring

   employment separations 71

   productivity of 71

   promotions 91

   wages of 69

Rafaeli, A. 121, 130

Rao, H. 207

recruitment

   adverse selection 17

   from within a company 3

   compensation and benefits 23–5

   lateral movements 27

   models of forecasting talent 2–4

   new paradigmns for 11–20

   online job search 17–20

   outside hiring 11–17, 27

   “passive” candidates 17, 18

   “vacancy chain” problem 16, 32

reductions in force 31, 32, 33, 35

reengineering 10, 35

restructuring 8, 31–56

   data for study on 36

   descriptive statistics on 41

   effect on employees 32, 34, 59, 60

   layoffs 49, 51, 53

   and managerial careers 34–5

   methods for study on 39–40

   negative effects of 31, 43

   promotion rates for survivors 32, 33, 40, 43, 54–7, 59, 60

   results of study on 40–53

   retirement 49

   study on 35–6

   variables in study on 37

retirement 35, 49, 75, 95, 98

Richards, David A. 206

Rosenbaum, J. E. 79

Rothbard, N. 130, 135

Rothbard, P. 137

Royalty, A. B. 71, 100

Rozilio, R. 130


salaries 38, 42, 44–5, 51, 84, 91, 104

Saporta, I. 58

Scheiber, S. 34

Schnader Harrison 206

Schon, D. 247

Scott, W. R. 226

seniority 24, 34, 78

Shah, N. 199, 204, 214, 228

Sherer, Peter 179–222

Shire, K. 126, 131

Sideman, L. 134

Simmel, Georg 148

Sin, H. P. 130

Singh, H. 206, 208, 211

Skadden 201, 204, 211

Smigel, E. O. 198

Snell, S. A. 191, 208

Sobecks, N. 232

social exchange theory 143, 149, 155

social networks 148

social norms 128

Spurr, S. J. 74

Stanford Project on Emerging Companies 216

Starbuck, W. H. 216

Steiner, D. 125, 127

Stewart, L. P. 74, 78

succession planning 5

Suddaby, R. 228

Swaine, Robert 198, 216


talent forecasting, models of 2–4

Tam, M. 126, 131

Taylor, P. 114, 123, 131

Taylorism 112, 114

temporary help services 143

tenure 78–9, 91, 94, 95, 104, 105

   changes in 31

   gender differences 21

   and job change 78

   promotions and 91, 94, 105

   separations and 95

   trends in 20–3

The American Lawyer 202, 213, 216

   Partner Mobility Data 202, 213, 214, 216

The Organization Man 1–2, 5, 23

Totterdell, P. 123, 128, 131, 135

training, apprenticeship-style 226

triadic employment relationships 26, 142–51

   agency–client relationships 157, 160–70, 171–2

   agency–worker relationships 144, 159, 160–4, 162, 164, 167, 170, 171–2, 173–5

   balancing of 164, 174, 175

   billing rates and wages 150

   bridging and buffering between client, agency and worker 156–8

   brokering between the agency, client and worker 158–60

   client companies in 143

   client–worker relationships 157, 159, 164, 167, 168–70

   consequences of such arrangements 147, 148

   data and method for study on 149–54

   definition of 143–9

   disintermediation 164–7, 168, 169, 170, 171

   dynamics of 148

   features of 147–9

   growth of 144, 145, 146, 174

   impact on employment outcomes 154–72

   information in 168

   legal status of workers in 144, 157, 164, 173

   non-competition clauses 159, 165

   reinforcement in 155–64, 174, 175

   research on 147

   role of the agency 157

   social structure of 148

   study of 150–2, 153–4

   sustainability of 175

   workers in 172–3


union status 85, 99, 105

“up or out” career paths 4, 26, 65–77

US Bureau of Labor Statistics 7, 144, 145

US Glass Ceiling Commission 59

utility 69–70


“vacancy chain” problem 16, 32

Valletta, R. 34

Viscusi, W. K. 74

Von Nordenflycht, A. 228


wages 84

Walker, James 2

Watkins, Latham 210

Watson, A. 114, 123, 131

Weber, Max 62

Weiss, A. 79

Whetten, D. A. 182, 183

White 16

Whitefield, R. 199

Whyte, William H. 1–2

Wilk, Steffanie 26, 111–41

Williamson, O. E. 208

women 107; see also gender

   cost of hiring 69

   employment separations 71

   mobility of 58

   productivity of 71

   promotion rates 57, 58, 59, 61

   wages of 69

   in the work force 94

work

   blue-collar 8

   contingent 7, 147

   white-collar 1–2, 5–10, 25–7

workforce planning 5

Wormley, W. M. 89


Yap, Margaret 26, 65–111

Yaskiel, Eva 210


Zabusky, S. 226

Zollo, M. 206, 208, 211


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