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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare

Details

  • 3 tables
  • Page extent: 178 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.25 kg

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521671880)




Contents




  List of figures and tables page viii
  Preface ix
 
  Chapter 1 Character 1
 
  Juliet’s balcony, Verona 1
  Shakespeare’s realism? 3
  Shakespeare’s ‘unreal’ characters 4
  Reading Shakespeare’s characters on the page 6
  Embodying Shakespeare’s characters on stage 7
  Doubling on the early modern stage 8
  Writing for particular actors 11
  Falstaff: character as individual or type? 12
  Naming and individuality 12
  Characters as individuals or as inter-relationships 14
  Character: interior or exterior? 17
  Character: where next? 19
 
  Chapter 2 Performance 23
 
  Measure for Measure: staging silence 23
  ‘Going back to the text’: the challenge of performance 26
  Performance interpretations: The Taming of the Shrew 27
  Topical performance: the plays in different theatrical contexts 30
  Citing performances 32
  Using film 33
  Using film comparatively: Macbeth 35
  Hamlet: ‘To be or not to be’ 39
  Adaptations: Shakespearean enough? 41
  Performance: where next? 42
 
  Chapter 3 Texts 46
 
  Shakespeare’s hand 46
  So what did Shakespeare write? 47
  Stage to page 48
  Quartos and Folio 49
  Editing as interpretation 50
  The job of the editor: the example of Richard Ⅱ 53
  Stage directions 57
  Speech prefixes 60
  The job of the editor: the example of King Lear 61
  Texts: where next? 65
 
  Chapter 4 Language 71
 
  ‘In a double sense’ (Macbeth 5.7.50) 71
  Did anyone really talk like that? 72
  Playing with language 77
  Language of the play / language of the person 79
  Prose and verse 81
  Linguistic shifts: 1 Henry Ⅳ 82
  Shakespeare’s verse 84
  Linguistic variation: A Midsummer Night’s Dream 85
  Language: where next? 87
 
  Chapter 5 Structure 90
 
  Finding the heart of the play 90
  Shakespeare’s genres: dynamic, not static 93
  Tragedy and comedy 94
  Tragedy – expanding the genre 95
  Comedy – expanding the genre 98
  History: is this a fixed genre? 101
  Structuring scenes: Much Ado About Nothing 103
  Juxtaposing scenes, activating ironies: Henry V 104
  Showing v. telling 106
  Structure: where next? 107
 
  Chapter 6 Sources 113
 
  Antony and Cleopatra and Plutarch 113
  Originality: was Shakespeare a plagiarist? 116
  Shakespeare at work: the intentional fallacy? 118
  The source bites back: Romeo and Juliet and The Winter’s Tale 120
  The strong poet? King Lear 127
  Sources: where next? 131
 
  Chapter 7 History 134
 
  Politic picklocks: interpreting topically 134
  History plays: political Shakespeare? 136
  History plays: Shakespeare as propagandist? 138
  Hamlet as history play? 140
  Jacobean patronage: King Lear and Macbeth 142
  Historical specificity: gender roles 144
  Race and Othello 148
  History: where next? 153
 
  Bibliography 157
  Index 162

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