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The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology

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  • Page extent: 750 pages
  • Size: 253 x 177 mm
  • Weight: 1.248 kg

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 (ISBN-13: 9780521670050)




Index



abductive actuations, 316n1

abortion, psychological process of, 102–103

Acosta, J. de, 374

act-purpose ratio, 76, 78

action/agency metaphor, 571–573

action theory, 7

   symbolic, 4

activity system, 492–495, 695

activity theory. See cultural-historical activity theory

actuations, 222–233, 234

   abductive, 316n1

   agent to actor transition, 231–232

   attention concept, 230

   dramaturgical scripts and, 232–233

   emotion concept, 230

   evolution into performance, 232–233

   internal structure of, 223–227

   learning concept, 230

   perception concept, 230

   process/object/situation/actor production, 227–232

   requisites for development of, 222–223

   scripts and, 230–231

   situations and, 230–231

affective act, 221, 223–226

affordances, 30, 117, 125, 220, 221, 227, 296–297

agency

   conventional symbols and, 305–306

   self-reflection and, 67–68, 76, 78

agentic mind, 326–327

alerity (otherness), 610–611

Altmann, S. A., 141

amae concept, in Japan, 52, 322, 333–334, 335

anagenesis, 161n4

Anderson-Slosberg, E., 427

Andronov, V. P., 389

animism, 44, 45, 396, 397

Anokhin, P., 6, 17n2

anthropogenesis, 8

anthropology

   psychological, 321–322

   self-reflective, 69

antilocationists, 6

Ape Language Research (ALR)

   automata and, 170

   bonobo/child language comprehension, 166–167

   Calvin work on, 175, 176–177, 179

   classroom setting for, 168

   critical development period, 165

   culture role in acquisition, 168–172

   debate on learning humanlike language, 168

   enculturation of nonhuman animals, 166, 171–172

Ape Language Research (ALR) (cont.)

   ethnographic narrative, on language acquisition/use, 172–183

     boundlessness, 174–175

     cultural creativity/generality, 177–178

     cultural unity, 180–181

     flexibility of reactions, 182

     gestures/tools, 179–180

     immanence, 176–177

     media other than speech, 180

     moral/personal dimension, 182–183

     nonarbitrariness, 181

     placement, 178–179

     reflexivity, 181–182

     spontaneity, 172–174

   history of, 164–166

   innateness of language, 168

   Kellogg work on, 166, 183, 183n2, 183n4

   poverty of stimulus notion, 169, 170, 173

   Rumbaugh/Savage-Rumbaugh work on, 159–160, 165–166

   Savage-Rumbaugh work on, 154, 166–167, 168, 173, 174, 182–183, 183n5, 184n5

   Terrace work on, 168, 169–170

Apel, K. O., 218

Arakawa, A., 102–103

argumentative symbolic legisign, 216

Aristotle, 23–24, 29, 40, 41, 273n7

associative reflexes, 6

attention concept, 230

attractors, 30

Austrian school of Gestalt discourse, 7–8

authentic mind, 327

autobiographical memory, 650

autoorganized development, 135

Azuma, H., 335

Bakhtin, M., 8, 77, 345

   on communication, 608

   on culture as boundary/relationship, 466

   on dialogism, 449

   on discourse, 68

   on heteroglossia, 449, 612

   on language appropriation, 74

   on linguistic mediation, 648

   on utterances, 611

   on value of novels, 612–613

   on ventriloquation, 64–65

   on voice, 64

Baldwin, J. M., 9, 221

Bandura, A., 570

Baron-Cohen, S., 379

Barthes, R., 48, 261

Bartlett, F., 549, 551–552, 553, 640n6, 646, 654, 661

Bastelbiographie, 408

Bateson, G., 465–466

Batson, C., 331

Bauer, M. W., 681–682

Baumeister, R. F., 633–634

Beck, U., 405, 406, 408, 410, 413, 416–417

Beck-Gernsheim, E., 405, 406, 408, 413, 416–417

behavior-reader strategy, of communication, 153

behaviorism, 6

Bellelli, G., 627

Bentley, A., 115

Berger, P. L., 65

Bergson, H., 98, 363

Berlin, I., 567

Bernstein, N., 17n2, 130–131

Bhabha, H., 478

bifurcation points (BFPs), 30, 97–98

Billig, M., 118–119, 619

Binet, A., 85

biofunctionalism, 374–375

Blasi, A., 567

Bloch, M., 669

Blumenthal, A. L., 31

Bodnar, J., 650, 655

Boesch, E. E., 569

bonobos, upright posture/bipedalism use, 188

Bordes, F., 191

boundary zone, 414

Bourdieu, P., 65, 694

Bourne, E. B., 334

brain functioning, 133–134

brain trace, 130–131

Bråten, S., 616

Brentano, F., 221

Bronfenbrenner, U., 279

Broom, R., 193

Brown, R., 628, 629

Bruner, J., 239, 252, 257–259, 272n3, 337, 461, 647–648

Brunswik, E., 91

Buddhism, 330, 379, 395, 399n8, 530

Budgeon, S., 410–411

Bühler, K., 8, 271

Burke, K., 75–76

Byrne, R. W., 152, 153

Cacioppo, J., 333

Call, J., 152, 153

Calvin, B., 175, 176–177, 179

Carr, H., 112

Casey, E., 671–672

centers mobility concept, 285–286

Chaiklin, S., 502

Chandler, M. J., 409–410

Change Laboratory, 492–495, 502–503

characteriological tradition, 70

Cheney, D. L., 156

child development

   Darwin on, 84, 165

   stages of, 487

   Vygotsky on, 117, 259, 271

   See also early cognitive development; exchange and possession, child development and; Network of Meanings perspective; peer interaction; peer interaction, in preschool; symbol formation and time/movement

.

child directed speech (CDS), 425

child study movement, 85

child vs. developmental psychology, 85

chimpanzees

   cultural behavior of, 196

   Pan erectus Project, 188

   upright posture/bipedalism use, 188

   See also Ape Language Research; hominids, biological/cultural evolution of

.

Choi, S.-C., 326, 334

Chomsky, N., 168, 169, 170, 184n6, 257–258, 272n1

circular reactions, 221, 222–223, 226

classical τ model, 127

Clifford, J., 470

clinical and legal psychology, 72

co-emergence thesis, 685

cognition, sociocultural view on, 63

cognitivism, 26

Colby, A., 563, 569

Cole, J., 669–670

Cole, M., 77, 135

collective memory

   cultural tools for, 647–648

   habit memory and, 647

   history vs. memory, 650–653

   mediation role in, 646–648

   schematic vs. specific narrative templates, 653–654

     schematic narrative template example, 654–655

   social organization of, 655–657

   strong vs. distributed accounts, 646–648

   vs. individual memory, 648–650

     accuracy criterion and, 649–650

     autobiographical memory, 650

     memory distortion and, 649

     memory politics and, 650

     official/vernacular culture, 650, 655

     social difference/identity and, 650

   See also collective memory, for public events; memory, as sociocultural phenomenon

.

collective memory, for public events

   flashbulb memory, 628–632

     emotional determinants of, 629–630

     social determinants of, 630–631

     vs. autobiographical memories, 631–632

   generational memories, 625–627

   oblivion/distortion of, 633–635

     commemorations, 635

     contextual framing, 634

     direct falsification, 634

     embellishment/ennobling, 634

     historical analogies, 635

     historical contexts, 635

     linking vs. detaching, 634

     mass media role in, 629–630, 634–635

   public commemoration role in, 632–633, 640n4

   reminiscence bump, 627–628, 656

   selective bias in, 637–639

   social identity and, 632–633

   special encoding hypothesis and, 629

   theoretical construct of concerns and, 630

   voluntary/nonvoluntary memory distinction, 636–637

   See also collective memory; memory, as sociocultural phenomenon

.

collective mentality, 67

communication

   adaptive, 144

   animal/human, 154–157

     access to representations of other, 155

     ape use of symbols, debate on, 159–160

     motivation for, 156–157

     reference concept in, 155–156

     shared representations and, 155

   basic components of, 145

   behavior ecologists on, 144–145, 149–150

   behavior-reader strategy, 153

   concept of, 141–142

   emotional expressions and, 241–242

   evolution of forms of, 142

   face-to-face interactions, 241

   information and, 143–145

     sematectonic, 143–144

     semiotic network, 143

   perceptive-cognitive apparatuses, 148–150

     fixed action patterns, 149, 150, 155

     input-output organizing system, 149

     multisensorial perception, 148–149

     signal processing schema, 149–150

     template for, 149

communication (cont.)

   primate, 153–154

     aggressive/intimidatory displays, 153

     begging gesture, 153

     cooperative behavior, 153–154

     side directed behavior, 153

   primates, social life and, 151–153

     deception strategy, 152

     episodic memory and, 151

     mind-reader strategy, 153

   reorganization of perceptive systems/ emergence of birds/mammals, 150–151

   selfish gene approach to, 144–145

   signals, 142, 145–148

     communicative forms, 145

     context of, 148

     discrete, 147, 148

     displays, 145, 151, 155

     evolution of, 147

     facial expressions, 145, 151, 154

     functional extension, 146

     gestures/vocalizations, 153–154

     intensity of, 147

     intention movements, 146

     ontogenic ritualization, 147

     physical medium of transmission, 145–146

     plurimodal, 147–148

     postures, 151, 161n2

     ritualization, 146–147

     social/ecological conditions for, 146

     typical intensity of, 147, 148

     unimodal, 147, 148

     variable intensity of, 147

     variations/transduction movements, 146

   signs, 157–160

     higher mammal use of, 157–158

     icons, 157, 159

     index, 157

     new sign genesis by higher mammals, 158

     as opposite of signals, 157

     recursivity and, 160

     symbols and, 157, 159–160

computer metaphor, 116

Comte, A., 10

concrete psychology, 376–379

   decision/purpose function, 377

   executive function, 377, 384

   free will function, 377

   long-term conscious orientation, 377

   voluntary attention function, 377

conditional reflexes, 6

Confucism, 330–331

Connerton, P., 647, 672–673

conscious, 617–618

consciousness

   experience and, 31–32

   historical, 8

   immediate, 31

conversational analysis (CA), 424

Conway, M., 630, 631, 650

Cooley, C. H., 680

Coppens, Y., 193

Cornelius, H., 7

Corsaro, W. A., 447, 448, 452, 453–454, 456

Côté, J. E., 409

crisp set, 86

critical psychology, 27

cronotope, 77

cross-modal remembering,

cultural-genetic psychology, 375, 379–380, 387–389

   See also directivity

.

cultural-historical activity theory (CH-AT)

   assessing, in practice, 501–503

   Change Laboratory, 492–495, 502–503

   developmental stages, traditional, 487

   double stimulation method, 485, 492–495

   double stimulation method, Change Laboratory, 492–495

   Elkonin-Davydov teaching-learning interventions, 489–490, 501–502

   idiocultures, 5th Dimension intervention, 495–501, 503

     evaluating intervention, 499–501

     ideal type for, 498–499

     joint activity for, 497–498

     social-ecology of 5th Dimensions, 496–497

   intervention, examples, 488–501

   intervention, mathematics, 490–491, 501

   intervention research principles, 485–488

     cultural organization of human life, 486

     essential analysis unit, 486

     ethical/strategic contradictions, 488

     genetic perspective, 486–487

     idioculture, 486

     mediation through artifacts, 485

     social origins of higher psychological functions, 487–488

   motivation/reflection role in, 491–492

   overview of, 484–485

cultural-historical school, 8

cultural mismatch, 462

cultural norms, 331

cultural psychology

   core research aims, 53–57

   dichotomies in, 56

   documentary method, 56

   empirical method, 56

   historicity/contingency of subjectivity, 54–55

   metaphor analysis, 50, 52–53, 56

   self-reflexivity need in, 55–56

   vs. traditional psychology, 45–46

culture

   constructivist view on, 460

   defining, 168–172

     analytical archaeology on, 200

     de Waal on, 197

     Geertz on, 118

     Mosterín on, 197

     Murphy on, 169

   dialogic view on, 460

   dualistic approach to, 467–468, 480n1

   essentialist view on, 460

   official vs. vernacular, 650, 655

   vs. biology, 119

   See also dialogue, culture as

.

Curci, A., 627, 630, 631–632

curiosity, 5

Daddesio, T., 273n7, 273n8

Damon, W., 563, 569

Danziger, K., 68, 85–86, 663

D’Arcy, N., 656

Dart, R., 189, 193

Darwin, C., 84, 165, 232

   See also Darwinism

.

Darwinism

   on emotional expressions, 241–242

   on humanity as product of biological evolution, 6

Davidov, V. V., 389, 489, 490, 501

Dawkins, M. S., 149

de Waal, Frans, 152, 158

Deacon, T. W., 159–160

death rate, 88

Deleau, M., 272n4, 273n4

Denzin, N. K., 164

Dershowitz, A., 587

Descartes, R., dualism of, 24, 480n1

detraditionalization, 406

devadasi tradition, 525–526

developmental psychology

   contingent experiences, 95–96

   development as process, 94–95

   vs. child psychology, 85

Dewey, J.

   on experience, 311, 561

   on rupture theory, 679

   on Watsonian psychology, 113

dharma, 531

dialectical-historicism, 8

dialectical-materialism, 8

dialogical polyphony, 612–613

dialogical self-theory, 612

dialogicality, 610

dialogicity, 425

dialogism

   basic axiomatic principles of, 609–614

     alerity (otherness), 610–611

     criticisms of, 613–614

     cultural context, 611–612

     dialogical polyphony, 612–613

     dialogical self-theory, 612

     dialogicality, 610

     relational primacy, 609–610

   structural elements of, 614–619

     conscious, 617–618

     fluidity/regularities, 615–616

     multilayered system, 616–617

     supraconscious, 618–619

     (un)conscious, 614–615

dialogue, culture as

   children-/adult-run educational unilateralism, 464–465

   creole committees in education, 471–478

     distractions, sanctioning, 476–478

     listening skills, 472–476

   essentialist view on, 460–462

   essentialist view on, ready-made, 465

   interactional breakdown in classroom

     alternative nonessentialist view on, 465–471

     cultural mismatch, 462–471

   third space of classroom dialogue, 478–480

Dias, F. P., 634

dicentic indexical legisign, 216

dicentic indexical sinsign, 216

dicentic symbolic legisign, 216

Dilthey, W., 6

Ding An Sich, 329

direct/indirect perception, 117

directivity

   behavior and, 373–380

   dual meaning of, 375

   functions of, 374–380

     biofunctionalism, 374–375

     concrete psychology, 376–379

     cultural-genetic, 375, 379–380

     decision/purpose, 377

     evolutionary congruence, 379–380

     executive, 377, 384

     free will, 377

     long-term conscious orientation, 377

     materialism, 374–375

     natural history of the sign, 375–376

     psychotecnics, 380, 388, 399n4

     voluntary attention, 377

   Lord’s Prayer, The, as cultural reconstruction of orientation, 392–396

     constitution of spiritual world theme, 393–394

     human species as human family theme, 392–393

directivity (cont.)

     moral directivity theme, 394–395

     postural/situated operators, 395–396

     religious catharsis, 396–398

   Lord’s Prayer, The, as psychotecnics of feeling, 390–392

     actual words/meditation analysis, 391–392

     categories of analysis for, 392–396

     generating consciousness, 390–391

   mediational ecology and, 380–386

     ecology of kingdom of heaven, 383–384

     ecology of kingdom of heaven, religious, 382–383

     expert religiousness, 384

;

     locus of consciousness, 382

;

     objects/gestures/ voices and, 382–383

;

     embodiment/cultural ecology of directivity, 380–382

     expert religiousness, 384

     externally/internally oriented operators, 380–381

     imaginary ecology, 381–382

     meditation, 384–386

     popular religiousness, 383

     prayer as linking tool, 384

     religion as social world, 384

     situated ecology, 381

   protocol analysis and, 386–389

     abbreviated/double formation mental actions, 388–389

     cultural-genetic tradition, 387–389

     cultural mediation view on, 387–389

     everyday life protocols, 387–388

     verbal protocol/mental operation relation, 386–387

   religious experience in psychology, status of, 373–374

   Syncretic Zone of Representation and, 376

   See also cultural-genetic psychology

.

Diriwächter, R., 94

discourse, changing meaning of, 9

discourse analysis, 47–49

   speech-act theory and, 118–119

disembedded subjects, 55

Dissanayake, E., 246

Do-It-Yourself (DIY) personal life projects, 405, 408–410

   illustrations of, 410–412

Doi, T., 322, 334

Donald, M., 159

Dostoevsky, F., 648

double simulation method, 485

doublespeak, 43

Douglas, M., 646

Dower, J., 652

dramaturgical scripts and, 232–233

   actuations, 232–233

dramaturgy, 75–76, 388

Driesch, H., 96

Dube, 535–536

Dumont, L., 535

Dunbar, R., 151, 161n6

Durkheim, E.

   on morality, 564–565

   on religion, 373, 374

   on ritual, 633

   on suicide, 536

dynamic object concept, 212

Dynamic Systems Theory, 29, 30–31

dynamic touch, 125, 129

early cognitive development

   natural signs/interpretation of, 260–261, 271

   objects and, 261–265

     complexity of appropriation of, 268–269

     conventional uses of, 265–270

     myth of evidence of object, 265–266

     naturalistic view of, 261

     pragmatic view of, 261

     private gestures and, 269–270, 271–272

     spontaneity and, 266

     temporal acquisition of, 267–268

   theory of language acquisition, of Bruner, 257–259

     meaning/use link in, 258–259

     object use, 259

     pragmatic opportunism, 257, 270

   triadic interactions, 262–263, 271

     indexical gestures/signs, 263–264

     object permanence acquisition, 264–265

     roots of first symbols, 264

   words, meaning of, 259–260

Ebbinghaus, H., 663

Eco, U., 592

eco-cultural analysis of psychological operations, 388

Ecological Hypothesis of African Acheulean, 196–200

ecological validity, 91

ecology of spirit, 380–386

   ecology of kingdom of heaven, 383–384

     expert religiousness, 384

     popular religiousness, 383

   ecology of kingdom of heaven, religious, 382–383

     expert religiousness, 384

     religious consciousness, 382–383

   embodiment/culutral ecology of directivity, 380–382

   externally/internally-oriented operators, 380–381

   imaginary ecology, 381–382

   meditation role in, 384–386

   prayer as linking tool, 384

   religion as social world, 384

   situated ecology, 381

   See also directivity

.

educational psychology, 85

effectivities, 30, 221, 227

Ehrenfels, C. v., 7, 8

Einstein, A., 3

Ekman, P., 52

Elias, N., 68

Elkonin, D. B., 487, 489–490

Elkonin-Davydov teaching-learning interventions, 489–490, 501–502

embodied mind theory, 265

embodiment theory, 378

emotion, cultural psychological analysis of

   indigenous psychology, 329–338

     affect attunement, 332–333

     amae concept, 322, 333–334, 335

     emotional contagion, 333

     emotional convergence, 332

     empathy, 331–332

     future directions, 336–338

     mind as mediator of social behavior, 334–335

     value of studying cultural psychology, 334–337

   individualism/collectivism studies, 322

   psychological anthropology studies, 321–322

   research on emotion in different cultures, 318–329

     cross-cultural, 322

     cultural emotions, 321–322

     ecological fallacy,

     entity approach, 319–320

     indigenous emotional concepts, 321–322

     insider analysis of own cultural emotions, 322

     interpsychic phenomena, emotions as, 320–321

     universalist paradigm, 318–319

   shimcheong psychology, 322–323

     discourse, 327–328, 328t

     extrospective analysis, 324–325

     incidents, 324

     introspective analysis, 324

     meaning of shimcheong, 323

     mind experience in, 326

     mind psychology of Koreans, 326–327

     phenomenological process, 323–329

     preconditions for, 323–324

     relational self and, 325–326

     shimcheong as universal phenomenon, 335–336

     shimcheong culture role in understanding, 329–331

     shimcheong in existing literature, 331–334

     summary of, 328–329

emotional expressions, and communication, 241–242

enculturation, 135

   of nonhuman animals, 166, 171–172

Engeström, Y., 484, 485, 681, 695

Engles, F., 8

entelechia, 23–24, 29

episodic memory, in primates, 151

equifinality points (EFPs), 96, 97

Er, N., 630

Erickson, K. A., 386–387, 628

ethics, in practice based sampling, 92, 92t

etic/emic approach, 33–37

euphemism treadmill, 43

everyday life, mythology of, 48

evolutionary congruence, 379–380

exchange and possession, child development and

   buying/selling studies, 510

   characteristics of money for child, summary of, 519–520

   child and economics, 509

   homo economics concept, 508–509

   maxims of developmental psychology for money

     human relationships, 509–511

     meaning of money as cultural tool/ mediation tool, 513–518

     money as tool with specific meaning to subject, 512–513

     social/cultural meanings, 511–512

     summary of, 518–519

   mediated relationships, 517–518, 520

   money as gift, 512

   money from labor, 512

   money role in child life-world, 515–516

   pocket money study, 512–513

   possessions role in child life-world, 513–515

   poverty/wealth studies, 510

   social representation studies on poverty/wealth, 510–511

   sociocultural context effect on, 509–511

   subjective value of possessions and money, 511–512

executive function, in concrete psychology, 377, 384

exempla, 43

expansive learning, 681

experience, social-cultural-historical nature of, 32–33

experiential realism, 52

experimental neurosis, 679

experimental phenomenology, 31

experimental psychology, 84–85

expert religiousness, 384

face-to-face interaction, 241

facial expressions, 145, 151, 154

Falmagne, R. J., 404–405

false entities, 44, 48

false memory syndrome, 665

family, cultural values and

   economic dimension of family cohesiveness, 526

   family as cultural institution, 525–526

   family as study unit, 529–530

   family systems, 528–529

   idea of family, 527–528

   Indian family, spiritual evolution of individual in, 532–537

   language/relationships within family, 531–532

   self-family relationship, 530–531

fantasy play, 447–452, 457–458

Fechnerian psychophysics, 88

Feigenberg, J. M., 131

Fentress, J., 666–667

Ferreira, T., 614

Fields, W. M., 153

5th Dimension intervention, 495–501

   evaluating, 499–501

   ideal type for, 498–499

   joint activity for, 497–498

   social-ecology of, 496–497

Finkenauer, C., 629–630

Fisher, R. A., 130

Fisher’s “three principles”, 88

Fitzgerald, J., 656

flashbulb memory (FBM), 628–632

   emotional determinants of, 629–630

   social determinants of, 630–631

   vs. ordinary autobiographical memories, 631–632

Fodor, J., 125

Fonyi, A., 349–350

forced choices, 406–407

forensic self and, 662

Fossey, D.,

Foucault, M.

   on discourse, 47, 48

   on institutional support of discourse, 65

   on self-reflection, 66, 67

Fouille, A., 70, 79n4

Frankena, W. K., 567

Frankl, V., 610

free will, 377

Freeman, M., 371

Freud, S., 53, 565

Frijda, N. H., 632–633

functional systems theory, 133–134

Funder, D. C., 414

Galperin, P. Ia., 377, 389

Ganzheitspsychologie, 7

Gaskell, G., 681–682

Geertz, C.

   on culture, 46

   definition of culture, 118

Geist (spirit), 5, 7

Geisteswissenschaft, 5, 6

general systems theory (GST), 96

generational memories, 625–627

genetic field theory, 488

Gentner, D., 53

Gerber, E., 320

Gerth, A. H., 566

Gesell, A., 85

Gestalt psychology, 7–8

Gestaltqualität, 7

gestures/vocalizations, 153–154

Gibson, J. J.

   affordance concept of, 30, 117, 125, 220

   on behavior regulation, 128

   information concept of, 131

   vision analysis of, 126

Giddens, A., 55, 406

globalization, 406

Goffman, E., 452

Goldmann, L., 550

González, N., 223

Goodall, J., 153

Goode, W. J., 525

Graz School, 8

Greely, A., 373

Green, S., 149

Griffin, R., 135, 379

ground concept, 211

Grudin, J., 53

Guha, R., 532

Guildford, T., 149

Gutierrez, K., 478

habit memory, 647

Hacking, I., 662–663

Halbwachs, M., 635, 636–637, 646, 651

Hall, G. S., 85, 329

Hallett, D., 409–410

hand-axes, and bonobos, 200

Harré, R., 52

Hastings, S., 633–634

Hatfield, E., 333

Hauser, M. D., 141

Havelock, E. A., 44, 45, 66

Hayes, R., 471

Hedegaard, M., 502

Hedetoft, U., 75

Heelas, P., 321

Hegel, G., 57–58, 680–681

Heidegger, M., 41, 47, 58

Hermans, H., 612, 613

Highberger, L., 331

Hinduism, 530–531

historical consciousness, 8

historical data, 356

historical narratological strategy, 76

historically structured sampling (HSS), 96–104

   equifinality concept, 96–97

   equifinality points, 96, 97

   trajectory equifinality model based on, 97–98, 305

     bifurcation points, 97–98

     irreversible time concept, 98

     obligatory passage point, 98

     obligatory passage point, indigenous/exogenous, 98

     polarized equifinality point, 98

     sample study, cosmetic use by Japanese women in U.S., 101–102

     sample study, infertility in Japan, 98–101

     sample study, psychological process of abortion, 102–103

historico-cultural deficit approach, 461–462

Hitzler, R., 408

Hockett, C., 170

Holquist, M., 609

Homer, 44–45, 54

hominids, biological/cultural evolution of

   Ecological Hypothesis of African Acheulean, 196–200

   ethoecological cause for, 191–195

     australopithecus evidence, 192–194

   fire myth, 195–196

   forest bipeds, 187–188

     bipedalism as adaptive in forest, 188

     bipedalism as adaptive in savannah, 188

     postural vs. anatomical, 188

   hand-axes, 200

   Homo faber myth vs. Australopithecus habilis, 190–191

   nesting behavior, 188–190

   Pan erectus Project, 188

homo faber, 190–191, 374

homo metaphysicus, 45

homology, 161n4

Hood, R. W., 373

horizontal consistency, 38

Houser, N., 272n2

Hughlings-Jackson, J., 6

Humphrey, N. K., 151

icons, 157, 159, 214

idioculture, 486, 495–501, 503

Ifaluk people, 320, 322, 334

illusion, problem of, 114–115

Ilongot people, 321–322

imaginarium, 377, 381, 382, 383

Imberty, Michel, 244–245

immediate consciousness, 31

index, 214

indexical entailment, 448

indexical gestures/signs, 263–264

India, theory of emotion in Orissa town, 320–321

indigenous psychology, 329–338

   future directions for, 336–338

   mind as mediator of social behavior, 334–335

   shimcheong concept

     culture role in understanding, 329–331

     as universal phenomenon, 335–336

   shimcheong concept, in existing literature, 331–334

     affect attunement, 332–333

     amae and, 322, 333–334, 335

     emotional contagion, 333

     emotional convergence, 332

     empathy, 331–332

   value of studying cultural psychology, 334–337

inertia tensor, 125

inference revolution, 89

Inhelder, B., 306

institutionalized individualism, 405

intentional schemas, 223–227

interindividual variability, 37

internalization concept, 8

internalization metaphor, 136

interpretant concept, 212

interpsychic phenomena, emotions as, 320–321

intersubjective self, 616

intervention. See cultural-historical activity theory

intraindividual variability, 37

Jacques, F., 617, 619

Jahoda, G., 510

James, W., 6, 9, 233, 373, 377, 661

Jansz, J., 68

Japan

   amae concept in, 52, 322, 333–334, 335

   infertility study in, 98–101

Japanese, cosmetic use by Japanese women in U.S. study, 101–102

Javanese emotion (Sungkan), 321

Jaynes, J., 54

Jerison, H. J., 150

Jodelet, D., 544, 557

Johannesen, B. O., 449, 451, 454

Johanson, Donald, 188–189

Johnson, M., 52

Johnson-Laird, P., 155

Kant, I., 697

Kaplan, B., 241–242

kapwa, 322

Kashima, Y., 663

Katz, E., 349

Kawakita, J., 101–102

Kellog, W. N., 166

Kellogg, W., 166, 183, 183n2, 183n4

Kelso, J. A. S., 128–129, 130–131

Kido A., 101–102

Kim, C. W., 326

KJ method, 101–102

Klein, T., 331

Knightley, P., 634

knower/known dualism, 116, 697

Koenig, H. G., 373

Kohlberg, L., 565

Kovecses, Z., 52

Kulik, J., 628, 629

Kull, K., 220

Kurtz, S. N., 529

Lacan, J., 41, 680

Lakoff, G., 52, 53

Lalonde, C. E., 409–410

language

   discourse analysis, 47–49

   doublespeak, 43

   euphemism treadmill, 43

   false entities, 44, 48

   innateness of (see also Ape Language Research)

   linguistic determinism theory, 42

   linguistic relativism theory, 42

   linguistic structure differences among languages, 41–42

   linguistic structures, development of, 44

   meaning and, 8–10

   media relativity theory, 55

   metaphor analysis, 50, 52–53, 56

   new notions, development of, 43

   as not static/inert, 42–43

   social representations and, 49–52

   subject formation, 44–47

     agent of, 45–46

     language acquisition/acquisition by language, 46–47

language acquisition theory, 257–259

language games, 9, 63

Larson, D. B., 373

Larson, J., 478

Latour, B.

   on articulation, 57

   dualistic approach to, 467–468

   ready-made culture concept, 465

   on social structure/power distribution, 65

Law of Effect, 6

Lawrence, J. A., 412, 414

Lazarus, M., 5, 70, 71, 77–78, 79n3

Le Bon, G., 70, 79n4

Le Goff, J., 43

Leakey, L., 193–194

Leakey, M., 193

Leenhardt, M., 67

legisign, 214, 315

Leone, G., 627

Leontiev, A. N., 484–485, 487

Lerner, R., 373

Levi-Strauss, C., 345

Levy, P., 285–286, 287

Lévy-Bruhl, L., 66

Lewin, K., 367, 413–414, 488

Liebes. T., 349

Lillard, A., 334

Linell, P., 612

Linenthal, E., 652

linguistic competence, 272n1

linguistic determinism theory, 42

linguistic disposition, 272n1

linguistic relativism theory, 42

listenership, 425

Liszka, J. J., 298–299, 306

locationists, 6

Lock, A., 262–263

Locke, J., 661–662

Løkken, G., 446–447

long-term conscious orientation, 377

looking glass self, 680

López Aranguren, J. L., 378

Lord’s Prayer, The. See directivity

Lotman, Y. M., 486

Lotze, H., 6

Luckmann, T., 65

Lukoff, D., 373

Luminet, O., 630

Luria, A. R., 8, 133–134, 135–136

   on cultural mediation, 484–485

   on psychological functions, 375, 384

Lutz, A., 320, 334

Mahapatra, M., 567

Mannheim, K., 628, 655–656

map, as meaning-making device, 78–79

Marcia, 410

mark release concept, 88

Marková, A. K., 609, 610, 611

Marler, P., 149

Marques, J. M., 634

Marx, K., 489, 546

mass media, role in collective memory, 629–630, 634–635

   commemorations, 635

   historical analogies, 635

   historical contexts, 635

master-slave allegory, 680–681

material coping, 49

materialism, 8, 374–375

materiality/meaning dualism, 117–118

matter/mind dualism, 113, 114–115, 119

Maturana, H., 127, 138n4

Matusov, E., 464, 468, 471

McCullough, M. E., 373

McDermott, K., 649

McGraw, M. B., 129

McNemar, Q., 89

McTear, M., 425, 426

Mead, G. H.

   co-emergence thesis and, 685

   on self-reflection, 679

   significant symbol concept, 683

   theory of social act of, 684–685

meaning

   acts to action, 220–222

     action system, 221

     affective act, 221, 223–226

     affordances, 221, 227

     effectivities, 221, 227

     sensorial act, 221, 223–226

     volitional act, 221, 223–226

   actuations, 222–233, 234

     agent to actor transition, 231–232

     attention concept, 230

     dramaturgical scripts and, 232–233

     emotion concept, 230

     evolution into performance, 232–233

     intentional schemas, 223–227

     learning concept, 230

     perception concept, 230

     as producer of psychological processes, objects, situations, actors, 227–232

     requisites for development of, 222–223

     scripts and, 230–231

     situations and, 230–231

   biology and semiosis, 220

   circular reactions, 221, 222–223, 226

   of meaning, 207–208, 208t, 209

   meaning-making, and acting, 218–220

   See also meaning-making, Pierce’s semiotic logic

.

meaning-making, and acting, 218–220

meaning-making, Pierce’s semiotic logic, 210, 213t, 218

   dynamic object concept, 212

   ground concept, 211

   interpretant concept, 212

   object concept, 211–212, 214

   reality/fiction in, 217–218

   representamen concept, 211

   semiosis components, 210–211

   semiosis process, 211–212

   signs, classification of, 215–217

     argumentative symbolic legisign, 216

     dicentic indexical legisign, 216

     dicentic indexical sinsign, 216

     dicentic symbolic legisign, 216

     rhematic iconic legisign, 216

     rhematic iconic qualisign, 216

     rhematic iconic sinsign, 216

     rhematic indexical legisign, 216

     rhematic indexical sinsign, 216

     rhematic symbolic legisign, 216

   signs, definition of, 208, 208t, 211

   signs, theory of, 212–215

     argument, 214

     dicent sign, 214–215, 316n1

     icon, 214

     index, 214

     interpretation, 214–215

     legisign, 214, 315

     presentation, 213–214

     qualisign, 213–214

     re-presentation, 214

     rhema, 214, 316n1

     sinsign, 214

     symbol, 214

meaning of meaning, 207–208, 208t, 209

mediation

   in cultural-historical activity theory, 485

   role in collective memory, 646–648

mediation, role in collective memory, 646–648

mediational ecology. See ecology of spirit

mediational tool, 8

mediationism (representationalism)

   dualisms and, 116–119

   in mainstream cognitive psychology, 110–111

   in social cognitive psychology, 111–116

     computer metaphor, 116

     error, problem of, 113–114

     illusion, problem of, 114–115

     intellectualism fallacy, 115–116

mediationism (representationalism) (cont.)

     objectivized conception of behaviour approach, 112–113

     spectator theory of knowledge, 115

     stimulus-response approach, 113

     Theory of Mind approach, 111–112

   See also psychological phenomena, basic

.

Meinong, A., 8, 366

memory

   autobiographical, 650

   See also collective memory; collective memory, for public events; memory, as sociocultural phenomenon

.

memory, as sociocultural phenomenon

   Bartlett, influence beyond psychology, 666–675

     commemoration theme, 666–668

     conventionalism theme, 668–670

     mediation theme, 673–675

     objectification theme, 670–673

   conventionalization of cultural resources, 663–666

   cross-modal remembering,

   false memory syndrome, 665

   forensic self and, 662

   intersubjective turn, 662–663

   organized setting concept,

   reproductive accuracy, 665

   schema concept, 664–665

   serial reproduction, 664

   social organization of remembering in communicative action, 663–666

   stream of consciousness, 661

Menon, U., 320–321, 534

Menzel, E., 152

Merker, Bjorn, 250

metaphor analysis, 50, 52–53, 56

metaphor/sign parallels

   poetic motion in actions of sign, illustration of, 368–371

     prayer as symbolic resource, 369–370

     story background, 368–369

     transformations to new “meaning world” and authentic self, 370–371

   time-as-duration,

   time-as-pure-duration, 363

     as ephemeral/uncertain, 363

     imagined meaning, 365–366

     literal/imagined relation, 364–365

     literal/imagined relation, in poetry, 365–367

     literal meaning, 365

     meaning-as-motion in actions of sign, overcoming ambivalence in, 366–367

     meaning-as-motion in metaphor, 366

     meaning-as-poetic motion, 365–367

     sample poem, 365–366

     temporal boundary, uncertainty of, 364, 366

     as uncertain, 363

metonymy, 44

microgenesis, GC

Middleton, D., 650

Milgram, S., 569

mind

   agentic, 326–327

   authentic, 327

   embodied mind theory, 265

   as mediator of social behavior, 334–335

   theory of mind, 111–112, 152, 153, 246, 337

mind/body dualism, 7

mind experience in shimcheong psychology, 326

mind-reader strategy, 153

Mink, L., 651

Misztal, B. A., 662

modernity

   agency concept, 71–72, 74

   singularity concept, 71–72

Moghaddam, F. M., 586

moksha,

Molinari, L., 447

monological/dialogical relations, 610

moral psychology

   cognitive complexity effect on morality, 570

   cultural-psychological view on, 568–570

   dialectical-historical view on, 565–568

   discourse role in, 561

   instituted nature of mores/laws, 562–563

   intentionality and, 568–569

   life trajectories and, 569–570

   morality as drama,

   morality as drama metaphor, 571–573

   mores role in, 561

   narcissism/liquidity and, 571

   nature vs. culture and, 560–563

   primacy of consciousness and, 570–571

   science and, 563–565

   transmission/internalization of morality, 569

Moral Science, 32

Morgan, C. L., 38

Morris, C.

Moscovici, S., 49, 50, 412, 545–548, 552, 553–554

Mosterín, Jesús, 195

movement vs. action and semiosis, 219

Mozart effect, 173

Mpodozis, J., 127

Much, N. C., 567

multisensorial perception, 148–149

Murray, L., 244

mutual constraining, 405

Najmambali, A., 350

Nam-Gyoon, K., 131

Napier, J., 193

Nasaw, D., 452

natural history of sign, 375–376

Naturwissenschaft, 6

Nelson, K., 264, 689

neo-behaviorism, 113

neoclassical economics, 508–509

Network of Meanings perspective

   background of, 278–280, 288

   centers mobility concept in, 285–286

   cultural/social context of development, 281

   developmental constraint and, 286

   developmental trajectories and, 287–288

   diversity of networks and, 286–287

   multiple spatial-temporal dimensions in, 283–285

     becoming concept, 285

     lived-in/ontogenetic time, 284

     long historical/cultural time, 284

     prospective/future oriented time, 284

     short/present/ongoing/microgenetic time, 284

   network metaphor in, 285–286

   person in, notion of, 281–282

   relevance of interactive fields in, 280–281

   role coordination process and, 280

   sociohistorical matrix in, 282–283, 284, 286

   specificities of networks, 287

   uses of, 278, 288

neuropsychology, 8

Neyman, J., 89

Nine-Month Revolution, 262

nonequilibrium, 128

nonhuman primates. See Ape Language Research; communication

Nora, P., 651

normalized psychotecnics, 388

Novick, P., 651–652

objectivization/subjectivization, of social knowledge, 65

objectivism, 112, 113, 699–700

objects, 211–212, 214

   complexity of appropriation of, 268–269

   conventional uses of, 265–270

   myth of evidence of object, 265–266

   naturalistic view of, 261

   pragmatic view of, 261

   private gestures, 269–270, 271–272

   role in cognitive development, 261–265

   spontaneity and, 266

   temporal acquisition of, 267–268

obligatory passage point (OPP), 98

observational data, 356

onomatopoeia, 159

ontogenesis, 8, 685, 695, 701

open system, 96, 128, 221

Ornstein, R. E., 373

otherness, 610–611

Overton, W., 265

Paez, D., 632, 634

Park, L., 567

Parsons, A., 543, 544, 554–555

passage points, 97–98

Patton, M. Q., 91

Pavlov, I. P., 679

Paz, O., 365–366

peer interaction

   approach-avoidance and, 447

   challenging adult authority, 452–454

   collaborative emergence, 448–449

   disappearance-reappearance/fantasy play, 447

   implicit metacommunication, 449–451

   improvised fantasy play, 447–452, 457–458

   interpretive reproduction, 444, 445–446

   narrative practices, 449

   peer cultures/friendships, creating, 454–457

   ritualized sharing, 446–447

   secondary adjustments, creating/using, 452–453

   separate/innovative peer culture, 458

   utility point of view, 447

   See also peer interaction, in preschool

.

peer interaction, in preschool

   child view on “good conversation”, 426

   context role in, 441n4, 441n5

   conversational skills, 424–428, 428t, 440n1, 441n1

     child directed speech, 425

     dialogicity, 425

     listenership, 425

     speakership, 425

     turn-taking, 424

     whole conversation, 424–425

   developmental trends in, 425–427

     cross-turn cohesive markers, 425–426

     increase in remedial device use, 426

     move to longer stretches of discourse, 426

     topic initiation/re-initiation, 426

   open states of talk in, 429

   present study, 428–439

     activity-related to independent talk, 429–434

     data/method for, 428–429

     social talk patterns, 434–439

peer interaction, in preschool (cont.)

     transcriptions for, 430–439

   pretend play role in, 426–427, 441n6

   sociocultural view on, 427–428

Peirce, Charles S.

   on beliefs, 311, 315

   on induction, 87

   on rupture theory, 679

   semiotics and, 209–210

   on signs, 157

Pennebaker, J. W., 633

perception, knowledge as, 117

perceptive-cognitive apparatuses, 148–150

   fixed action patterns, 149, 150, 155

   input-output organizing system, 149

   multisensorial perception, 148–149

   signal processing schema, 149–150

   template for, 149

perpetual uncertainty of cultural life

   experience as irreversible,

   experience as reversible, 363

   poetic motion and senses, 362

Philogène, G., 551

phylogenesis, 8

Piaget, J., 9, 245, 246, 249

   on mental images, 306

   on morality, 565

   on natural systems, evolution/revolution of, 562

   on object permanence, 264

   on rupture theory, 679

Pinker, Steven,

Plato, 10, 23, 44, 45

Playdell-Pearce, C. W., 650

Pleasants, H., 468

plurimodal signals, 147–148

polarized equifinality point (PEFP), 98

popular religiousness, 383

positioning theory, on identity/rights/duties

   background on, 576–577

   conceptual framework of, 577–579

     identity issues, 578–579

     motives for positioning, 579

     positioning triangle, 579

     universal cycle of rights/duties, 578

   positioning on Iranian Nuclear Power Development Program, 579–587

     background of project, 579

     beginnings of nuclear power, 580–581

     conclusions, 586–587

     dynamic flow of intergroup relations theme, 586

     historical/geopolitical context of project, 579–580

     positioning by European Union, 585

     positioning by Iranian opposition, 585–586

     positioning by Islamic Republic of Iran, 581–584

     positioning by United States, 584–585

     right/duties theme, 586–587

poverty of stimulus, 169, 170, 173

practice based sampling, 92, 92t

   ethics in, 92, 92t

pragmatic opportunism, 257, 270

pragmatics vs. pragmatism, language and, 272n2

Prague Linguistic Circle, 8

Premack, D., 165

preschool child. See peer interaction, in preschool

presentative capacity of signs, 298–299, 306

Preyer, William, 84

primate communication, 151–154

primitive social relations, 586–587

probabilistic prognosis, 131

probalistic prognosis, 130–131

prodeclarative behavior, 263

Propp, V., 653–654

protocol analysis, 386–389

   abbreviated/double formation mental actions, 388–389

   cultural-genetic tradition, 387–389

   cultural mediation view on, 387–389

   everyday life protocols, 387–388

   verbal protocol/mental operation relation, 386–387

protoconversations, 244

Psyche

   defining, 30–33

   dualism of, 23–25

   history of concept of, 23–25

   radical change in meaning of, 44

   updating concept of, 28–30

psychological anthropology studies on emotion, 321–322

psychological distancing theory, 681

psychological phenomena, basic

   dualisms, 125

   dynamic systems theory, 127–130

   functional systems theory, 133–134

   information processing metaphor, 125

   motor control/intentional movement, 130–133

     bimanual coordination/pendulum-like arm movements/rhythmic movement coordination, 132

     coordination dynamics, 131–132

     probabilistic prognosis as controlling action, 131

   optic flow, 126–127, 131

   perception-action dichotomy, 125–127

   re-mediation from basic to social-cultural functioning, 134–136

   self-organized dynamic movement, 137

   syndromic analysis

   transit from basic to higher psychosocial process, 136–137

psychology

   as ambiguous science

   Austrian school of Gestalt discouse, 7–8

   behavior and sense concept in, 206–207

   Berlin-based Gestalt tradition, 7

   clinical and legal, 72

   consciousness and, 6, 8

   consciousness and experience in, 31–32

   dualisms in, 6–7

     idiographic/nomethetic, 7

     mind/body, 7

     parts/wholes, 7–8

   evolutionism, 6

   experience concept in, 205–206

   experimental

   Gestalt tradition, 7–8

   Graz School of, 8

   holistic, 7–8

   linguistic turn in, 8–10

     semiology/semiotics, 9, 10

     speech production, 9

     utterances, 9

   Psyche concept, 23–25

   Psyche concept, defining, 30–33

   Psyche concept, updating, 28–30

   religious experience studies, 373–374

   See also cultural psychology

.

psychology, theories in, 26–28

   consumption of vs. production of, 28, 37

   critical psychology, 27

   as identity markers, 26–27

   as intellectual tools, 27–28

   shift in equilibrium between functions of, 27

psychology of labor, 72

Psychopedagogy, 72

psychophysics, 137n3, 138n3

psychotecnics, 72, 380, 399n4

   of feeling, 390–392

   normalized, 388

Putnam, H., 206, 270

qualisign, 213–214

race, as idealistic/positivist concept, 72

Rakoczy, H., 262

Ramanujan, A. K., 532–533

Rapson, R., 333

rasa theory of emotion, 320–321

rationality, 63, 66, 78, 209, 697–699

Ratner, C., 321

Rayleigh-Bénard instability, 128–129

re-mediation, defining, 135

Reed, E., 117

relatedness theory, 330

relational primacy, 609–610

religion. See directivity

reminiscence bump, 627–628, 656

representamen concept, 211

representationalism (mediationism). See mediationism (representationalism)

representative theory of knowledge, 116

reverse action of sign, 683

Rheingold, H., 41

rhema, 214, 316n1

rhematic iconic legisign, 216

rhematic iconic qualisign, 216

rhematic iconic sinsign, 216

rhematic indexical legisign, 216

rhematic indexical sinsign, 216

rhematic symbolic legisign, 216

Richardson, F., 616

Ricoeur, P., 245

Riegel, K., 417

Rivière, Á., 232–233, 238, 248–249, 303

Rochat, P., 273n9

Roediger, H., 649

Rogoff, B., 445–446, 464

Rosa, A., 663

Rosaldo, R., 321–322

Rosch, E., 57

Rose, N., 68

Ross, M., 650

Rubtsov, V. V., 501

rule-related systems of sense in, 207

Rumbaugh, D., 159–160, 165–166

Rymes, B., 478

Saito, A., 545

Salgado, J., 614

Samoans, 320, 326, 334

sample

   defining, 86

   population in, 86–87

   See also sampling

.

sampling

   in behavioral sciences, 88–89

   confirming/disconfirming in, 91

   contingent events and, 95–96

   generalization based on homogeneity assumption, 87

   generalization issues, 93–94

     statistical vs. analytical generalization, 94

   historically structured sampling, 96–104

     bifurcation points, 97–98

     equifinality concept, 96–97

sampling (cont.)

     equifinality points, 96, 97

     irreversible time concept, 98

     obligatory passage points, 98

     obligatory passage points, indigenous/exogenous, 98

     polarized equifinality point, 98

     sample study, cosmetic use by Japanese women in U.S., 101–102

     sample study, infertility in Japan, 98–101

     sample study, psychological process of abortion, 102–103

     trajectory equifinality model, 97–98, 305

   intensity in, 91

   in natural sciences, 88

   politically important case in, 91

   probabilistic, 89, 91

   purposive, 89, 91

   random, 87, 89, 90, 91

   sample size, 94

   selection issues, 82–86

     biographical method, 84–85

     child as classificatory object, 85–86

     experimental methodology

     multiple case (Classifying science), 84, 85

     single case (Ideographic science), 83–84, 85

   situations vs. persons, 90–91

   in social sciences, 92, 92t

   in sociocultural psychology, 91–93

   statistical, 89

   steps in, 90

   stratified, 89

   types of, 91, 92, 92t

     capricious, 92, 92t

     cluster, 92, 92t

     convenience, 92, 92t

     independent, 92, 92t

     matched, 92, 92t

     one-point breakthrough, 92, 92t

     practice based, 92, 92t

     probabilistic, 89, 91

     purposive, 89, 91, 93, 93t

     quote, 92, 92t

     random, 87, 89, 90, 91, 92, 92t

     relational network based, 92, 92t

     representative, 92, 92t

     statistical, 89

     stratified, 89, 92, 92t

     theoretical, 92, 92t

Sandage, S., 668

Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, 42

saturated self, 699

Saussure, F. de, 209, 259, 273n5

Savage-Rumbaugh, S., 153, 154, 159–160, 165–167, 168, 173, 174, 182–183, 183n5, 184n5

Sawyer, R. K., 404–405, 412, 448–449, 451

Schachter, D. L., 668–669

Scheper-Hughes, N., 52–53

Schmittau, J., 491

Schneider, D. M., 531

Schudson, M., 667–668

Schuman, H., 626–627, 656

Schütz, A., 548

Schwartz, B., 656, 668

scientific inquiry, social/epistemic aspects of, 25–26

Scott, J., 626–627, 656

scripts, 230–231

Seele (soul), 5

Segwerdahl, P., 153, 177–178

self-reflection

   conflict theories of, 680–682

   defining, 678

   internalization theories, 682–684

   mirror theories of, 679–680

   rupture theories, 678–679

   social act theories, 684–685

   tourists/Ladakhis case study, 685–687

     criticisms of analysis, 687–688

     self-mediation and, 686–687

     short-circuiting and, 687

selfish gene approach to communication, 144–145

semeîon, 273n7

semiology, 9, 10, 209

semiosis components, 210–211

semiosis process, 211–212

semiotic mediation. See self-reflection

semiotics, 8, 10, 209–210

sense and meaning, 208, 208t, 209

sensorial act, 221, 223–226

Seyfart, R. M., 156

Shank, R., 400n13

Shaw, L., 331

Sherif, C. W., 488–489

Sherif, M., 37, 488–489

shimcheong psychology, 322–323

   meaning of shimcheong, 323

   phenomenological process of experiencing shimcheong, 323–329

     mind experience, 326

     mind psychology of Koreans, 326–327

     preconditions for, 323–324

     relational self, 325–326

     shimcheong calculation/introspective analysis, 324

     shimcheong discourse, 327–328, 328t

     shimcheong incidents, 324

     shimcheong scripts/extrospective analysis, 324–325

     summary of, 328–329

   shimcheong logics vs. fact logics, 328, 328t

Shweder, R. A., 320–321, 334, 567

Sigel, I. E., 681

signal processing schema, 149–150

signals, 142, 145–148

   communicative forms, 145

   context of, 148

   discrete, 147, 148

   displays, 145, 151, 155

   evolution of, 147

   facial expressions, 145, 151, 154

   functional extension, 146

   gestures/vocalizations, 153–154

   intensity of, 147

   intention movements, 146

   ontogenic ritualization, 147

   physical medium of transmission, 145–146

   plurimodal, 147–148

   postures, 151, 161n2

   ritualization, 146–147

   social/ecological conditions for, 146

   typical intensity of, 147, 148

   unimodal, 147, 148

   variable intensity of, 147

   variations/transduction movements, 146

signs, 157–160

   definition of, 208, 208t, 211

   genesis of new signs by higher mammals, 158

   icons, 157, 159

   index, 157

   natural history of, 375–376

   natural signs/interpretation of, 260–261, 271

   as opposite of signals, 157

   recursivity and, 160

   role in higher mental process, 398n3, 399n3

   symbols and, 157, 159–160

   use by higher mammals, 157–158

   See also signs, classification of; signs, theory of

.

signs, classification of, 215–217

   argumentative symbolic legisign, 216

   dicentic indexical legisign, 216

   dicentic indexical sinsign, 216

   dicentic symbolic legisign, 216

   rhematic iconic legisign, 216

   rhematic iconic qualisign, 216

   rhematic iconic sinsign, 216

   rhematic indexical legisign, 216

   rhematic indexical sinsign, 216

   rhematic symbolic legisign, 216

   See also signs; signs, theory of

.

signs, theory of, 212–215

   argument, 214

   dicent sign, 214–215, 316n1

   icon, 214

   index, 214

   interpretation, 214–215

   legisign, 214, 315

   presentation, 213–214

   qualisign, 213–214

   re-presentation, 214

   rhema, 214, 316n1

   sinsign, 214

   symbol, 214

   See also signs; signs, classification of

.

Silverstein, M., 448

Simmel, G., 511, 537

Simon, H. A., 386–387

Sinha, C., 258, 271

sinsign, 214

situated ecology, 381

size-weight illusion, 138n5

Sloterdijk, P., 46

Smith, A., 680

Smith, M. P., 468

social cognitive psychology, 111–116

   computer metaphor, 116

   error, problem of, 113–114

   illusion, problem of, 114–115

   intellectualism fallacy, 115–116

   objectivized conception of behavior approach, 112–113

   spectator theory of knowledge, 115

   stimulus-response approach, 113

   Theory of Mind approach, 111–112

social constructivism, 117–118

social Darwinism, 461

social norm construction, 37

social representation, 49–52

   material coping and, 49

   symbolical coping and, 49–50

social representations

   boundaries between cultures in, 549–550

   cognitive polyphasia in, 553–555

   cultural identity emergence in, 549–550

   culture as categorical representation, 549–550

   culture concept in, 543–545

   defining social representation, 545–548

   mental health/illness in contemporary India and, 555–557

   reflection as key characteristic of, 548–549

   social/cultural change in, 552–553

   time concept in, 550–552

social representations (cont.)

   types of, 545–548

     consensual/reified universes, 546–547

     hegemonic/emancipated/polemical, 547–548

     primitive mentality/mentality of modern society, 547

sociocultural pharmacology, 17

sociocultural phenomena, as open systems, 95

sociocultural psychology

   activity tradition, 4

   centrality of human experience in, 5

   construction of subject in, 64–68

     discursive control of human activity, 64–66

     individual, 64–65

;

     institutional, 65, 66

;

     normalization/change, 65–66

;

     power distribution and, 65

;

     reproduction of structures of meaning, 65

;

     self-reflective discourse, 66–68

     singularity/ agency transition, 67–68

;

   discursive conversational tradition

   evolutionary readings of cultural histories,

   experiment role in, 704

   frames of reference in, 703–704

   history of, 5–6

   methodology cycle in, 38, 702–703

   mindset of history in, 700–701

   objectivity of historical narravtive in, 699–700

   organization levels in, 33–37

   origins/development of

   psychology as discourse on sociocultural phenomenon, 68–74

     applied subdisciplines, 70

     collective psychology, 70–74

     agency and, 72

;

     auto-reflexive, 75–76

;

     humanities/social science concepts in second half of 19th century, 73t

;

     singularity and, 72

;

     weakness of, 73–74

;

     general psychology, 70, 74

     singularity/agency concept, 70, 71–72, 74

   reflexive approach to, 62–63

   as science of human cultural experience, 702–704

   self-reflexive tool, 75–76

     to address agency, 76–78

     act-purpose ratio, 76, 78

;

     agent-scene ratio, 76, 78

;

     to address individuality, 75

     thematic categories in grammar of explanatory functions, 77t

   semiotic mediational approach

   symbolic resource use in, 694

   understanding/explaining, 701–702

   See also psychology

.

sociocultural psychology, sub-concepts, 693

   actuation, 694–695

   ambivalence, 698

   human reason, 695–697

     developmental explanation of, 695–696

     search for truth [disequilibration] and, 696–697

     sense/morality and, 696

   interactuation, GC

   rationality, 698–699

     constructing own self [dialogical self], 699

   symbolic resources, 694

   uncertainty, 697–698

sociocultural thinking

   social transformations of society affect on, 8

sociocultural veterinary science, 17

sociogram, 65

sociology, defining, difficulty in

Socrates, 44

Sokol, B. W., 409–410

Sotillo, M., 232–233

Soul, 24

speakership, 425

spectator theory of knowledge, 115, 697

speech act theory, 258

Sperry, R., 564

Spink, M.J.P., 281–282, 283

Spirit, 24

St. Julien, J., 471

Steinthal, H., 70, 77–78, 79n3

Stern, D., 238, 241, 242, 332, 617

Stevens, Wallace, 365

stimulus-response approach, 113

stimulus-response psychology, 113

Stock, B., 648

Strandell, H., 447

Stratton, P., 527

stream of consciousness, 661

Stumpf, Carl, 7

structural linguistics, 8

supraconscious, 618–619

symbol, 214

symbol formation and time/movement

   child development background for

     origin of gestures, ritualization in, 239, 240

     conventional/representative gestures, 239, 248

;

deictic gestures, 239, 248

     pretend play, ritualization in, 239

   circular reactions, 245–246, 253

     primary circular reactions, 245

     secondary circular reactions, 245–246

     tertiary circular reactions, 246

   circular reactions, social, 246–253

     elaboration of movement in creation of gestures, 248–250, 253

     elaboration of movement in pretend play, 247–248, 253

     decoupling/beginning of fiction, 247

;

     elaboration of movement in temporal/pretend play, 251–253

     emergence of temporal play, 250–251

     genetics and sensory-motor intelligence, 246, 252, 253

     musical play, 250, 252, 253

   essential traits of movement, summary of, 253

   movement, as expression of vitality affects, 240–244

     dance as pure movement distilled by culture, 241, 242

     movement/action distinction, 240–241

     inanimate movement, 240

;

     living movement, 240

;

     movement/time/feeling, 241–242

     primary intersubjective exchanges and, 241

     proto-musical capacity of infant, 243–244

     repetition and, 244–245

     vitality affects, attunement as way of transmitting, 243–244

     vitality affects and diversity of sensations, 242–243

   temporal mechanism of music, 250

   temporal organization of movement, 244–245

     alternation of movement, 245, 250, 253

     protoconversations, 244

     rhythm and, 241, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 252, 253

     synchrony and, 244, 245, 250, 253

symbolic action theory, 4

symbolic capital, 65

symbolic communication, dramaturgical actuations and

   beliefs and actuations, 294–299

     consciousness as representation, 295

     consciousness/experience relation, 295

   experience/belief/consciousness relationship, 293–294, 309–315

     defining belief, 311–312

     defining consciousness, 312–315

     moral consciousness, 315

;

     phenomenological consciousness, 314–315.

;

     self-consciousness, 315

     defining experience, 311

   higher psychological functions development, 302–309, 310, 310t

     conventional symbols, and agency, 305–306

     conventional symbols, and imagination, 306

     from images to words, 307–308

     imagination role in, 306–307

     mediational actuation development, 303–304

     mediational symbols, social affordance of, 304–305

     motor actuations and emotion, 302

     suspended actuations, 302–303

     utterances/arguments/reason, 308–309

   social communication, 295–299

     actuations and scripts in, 297–299

     affordances and, 296–297

     dramatic actuations and, 296–297

     group communication development, 295–299

     mediation and meaning-making when performing actuations, 299–302

     acts and acuations, 299–301

;

     change from teleonomy to teleology, 301–302

;

     scripts, 301

;

     teleonomic semiosis, limits of, 299

;

     natural evolution of psyche before language and humanization appears, 299, 300t, 310t

     sign interpretation, 297

     social norms and, 296, 307–308

symbolic market, 65

symbolic politics (SP)

   alternative, 603–604

     cultural pluralism/hybridity, 603–604

     political autonomy, 604

     transborder identities, 604

   background to, 591–592

   cases illustrative of, 598–603

     European integration, 601–603

     immigration, 598–600

     war/warlike situations, 600–601

   context of, 596

   modalities of, 594–596

     imperative, 595

     indicative, 595

     subjective, 595–596

   narrative moves/communicative strategies in, 596–598

     depoliticization, 597

     humanization/personalization, 597

     idealization, 597

     legitimization, 597

     moral purpose, 597

     national/universal topoi, 597–598

   rationale of, 594

   use of to maintain fictions of non-political state, 592–594

symbolic power, GC, 65

symbolic resource use, 346–352

   aboutness of symbolic resources, 346

   constraints on, intersubjective and psychological, 355–356

   constraints on, social, 354–355

   deliberate use, 354

symbolic resource use (cont.)

   developmental understanding of, 352–354

     learning to use symbolic resources, 352–353

     transformations of uses, 353–354

   to examine life trajectory, 348–351

     interdependency in, 351–352

     interpersonal relationships, 349–350

     intrapsychic relationships, 349

     social group relationship, 350

     societal state relationship, 350–351

   further research needs, 356–357

   generative use, 348

   intuitive use, 354

   methodology, 356

   quasi use, 354

   reflective use, 354

   semiotic mediations in, 347–348

   symbolic bricolage, 345

   time orientation in, 346–347

   zero use, 354

   See also symbolic resources

.

symbolic resources, 343–344

   cultural elements concept, 344

   history of concept of, 345

   symbolic systems concept, 344

   theoretical relevance of concept, 345–346

   See also symbolic resource use

.

symbolical coping, 49–50

symbols, roots of first, 264

Syncretic Zone of Representation (SZR), 376

Taine, H., 70, 77, 79n4, 84

Takada, S., 102–103

talante concept, 378

Taoism, 330

technogram, 65

Terrace, H., 168, 169–170

Thelen, E., 129–130, 135

themata, 544

theory of language acquisition (Bruner), 257–259

   meaning/use link, 258–259

   object use, 259

   pragmatic opportunism, 257, 270

theory of mind (TOM), 111–112, 152, 153, 246, 337

third space of classroom dialogue, creating, 478–480

Thorndike, E., 6

time-to-contact models, 127

Tinbergen, N., 146, 149

Tobias, P. V., 189, 193

Tomasello, M., 152, 153, 172, 258, 262

topos, 43

Torschlusspanik, 41

Trawick, M., 535

Trevarthen, C., 241, 244, 616

triadic interactions, 262–263, 271

   indexical gestures/signs, 263–264

   object permanence acquisition, 264–265

   roots of first symbols, 264

Truslit, A., 240

truth, directive, 400n13

turn-taking, 424

Turvey, M. T., 125–126, 131

Umwelt, 143, 220, 231, 233, 305, 307, 560

Unamuno, M. de, 374, 385–386, 390–398, 399n9, 400n12

(un)conscious, 614–615

unimodal signals, 147, 148

universal progressivism, 461

utterances, 9

   as signs, 159

Vaihinger, H., 364–365

Valsiner, J., 286, 405, 412, 413–414, 613, 615, 616

van Drunen, P., 68

Varela, F., 138n4

vertical consistency, 27, 38

vitality affects, 298, 332–333

volitional act, 221, 223–226

volitional acts, 298

Völkerpsychologie, 70, 73, 74, 77–78, 79n3

Volkgeist, 72

voluntary attention, 377

voluntary/nonvoluntary memory distinction, 636–637

von Bertalanffy, L., 96–97

von Uexküll, J. J., 143, 220, 222

Vygotsky, L. S.

   on actuation regulation, 307–308, 315

   on autoregulatory functions, 134

   concrete psychology of, 376–379

   on cultural behavior, 487–488

   on cultural control of mental operations, 389

   on double simulation, 492

   dualism of, 480n1

   on educating child with sensory deficits, 135

   genetic notion of, 486

   on gestures, 239

   on human development, 117, 259, 271

   on language as semiotic system par excellence, 261

   on meaning/semiotics, 8

   on mediation, 345, 380, 484–485, 646–647, 673

   on natural history of sign, 381

   on overcompensation, 135

   on psychological functions, 91–93, 374, 375–376, 383, 384, 388

   on psychological system construction, 133

   on psychotecnics of feelings, 388, 399n4

   on psychotecnics of intellect, 388, 399n4

   on re-mediation process, 135–136

   on role of pretend play, 374

   on self-control, 374–375

   on self-reflection, 682–683

   theory of sign of, 683–684

   zone of proximal development of, 165, 183

wabi, 41

Waddington, C. H., 286

Wallon, H., 241–242, 272n4, 273n4, 281, 378, 384

Watsonian psychology, 112–113

Weldon, M. S., 646

Weltanschauung, 41, 381

Werner, H., 8, 241–242

Wertsch, J. V., 137

   on cultural tools/collective memory, 673–675

   on discourse, 68

   on mediational action, 445, 485

   on schematic narrative templates, 655, 656–657

Whitaker, 528

White, H., 76, 78, 651

Whiten, A., 152, 153

Whorf, B. L., 42, 58

Wickham, C., 666–667

Wilson, E. O., 141

Winnicott, D. W., 345

Wissenschaft, 26, 38, 38n1, 337

Wittgenstein, L., 8–9, 63, 258–259, 260

“wolf ” children, 166

Wright Mills, C., 566

Wundt, W., 5–6, 31, 70

   apperception concept, 7

   creative synthesis concept, 7

   on duality of Psyche, 24

   on psychology/natural science distinction, 84, 94

   sampling notion and, 88

Yasuda, Y., 98–101

Yin, R. K., 94

young adulthood, sociocultural interpretations of

   Do-It-Yourself constructions of personal life, 405, 408–410

     complexity of, 409

     identity capital and, 409

     personal ownership emphasis in, 409

     tentative quality of, 409

   Do-It-Yourself constructions of personal life, illustrations of, 410–412

     five-year goals, 411–412

     YouthWorks program, 410–411

   individualized individualism, 416–417

   institutional-personal mutual constraining processes, 413–415

   institutional-personal mutual constraining processes, in contemporary university, 415–416

   institutionalized individualism and, 405, 407–408

   internalization/externalization processes, 416

   mutual constraining process and, 405

   social life in late modernity, 406–407

     detraditionalization, 406

     forced choices, 406–407

     globalization, 406

     paradoxical, 407

     uncertainty, 406

   sociocultural connections to personal life, 412–413

Zac, L., 627

Zaporozhets, A. V., 377

Zen Buddhism, 545

zone of proximal development (ZPD), 165, 183

zoon logon echon (animal that masters language), 40

Zuckerman, G. A., 491, 501–502


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