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The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology

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  • Page extent: 750 pages
  • Size: 253 x 177 mm
  • Weight: 1.248 kg

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 (ISBN-13: 9780521670050)




The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology



This handbook provides a representative international overview of the state of our contemporary knowledge in sociocultural psychology – as a discipline located at the crossroads between the natural and social sciences and the humanities. Since the 1980s, the field of psychology has encountered the growth of a new discipline – cultural psychology – that has built new connections between psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, and semiotics. The handbook integrates contributions of sociocultural specialists from 15 countries, all tied together by the unifying focus on the role of sign systems in human relations with the environment. The handbook emphasizes theoretical and methodological discussions on the cultural nature of human psychological phenomena, moving on to show how meaning is a natural feature of action and how it eventually produces conventional symbols for communication. Such symbols shape individual experiences and create the conditions for consciousness and the self to emerge; turn social norms into ethics; and set history into motion.

Jaan Valsiner is a cultural psychologist with a consistently developmental axiomatic base that is brought to analyses of any psychological or social phenomenon. He is the founding editor (1995) of the journal Culture & Psychology. He is currently professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at Clark University. He has published many books, the most recent of which are The Guided Mind (1998), Culture and Human Development (2000), and Comparative Study of Human Cultural Development (2001). He edited (with Kevin Connolly) the Handbook of Developmental Psychology (2003). He established the new journal on individual case analyses, International Journal of Idiographic Science (2005), and is the editor of Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Sciences and From Past to Future: Annals of Innovations in Psychology (2007). In 1995, he was awarded the Alexander von Humboldt Prize in Germany for his interdisciplinary work on human development. He has been a visiting professor in Australia, Brazil, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

Alberto Rosa is professor of psychology at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. He is a member of the Sociedad Espanola de Historia de la Psicologia and the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research, and he has served as vice president for the latter since 2005. In 1987, the Spanish Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs awarded him the Second National Award for research and technical aids to the handicapped. He has taught courses in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Italy, Mexico, and Sweden.





The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology

Edited by

JAAN VALSINER
Clark University

and

ALBERTO ROSA
Universidad Autonoma de Madrid





CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo

Cambridge University Press
32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013–2473, USA

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org-9780521854108

© Cambridge University Press 2007

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception
and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements,
no reproduction of any part may take place without
the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2007

Printed in the United States of America

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
The Cambridge handbook of sociocultural psychology / edited by Jaan Valsiner, Alberto Rosa.
   p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN-13: 978-0-521-85410-8 (hardback)
ISBN-10: 0-521-85410-5 (hardback)
ISBN-13: 978-0-521-67005-0 (pbk.)
ISBN-10: 0-521-67005-5 (pbk.)
1. Social psychology. 2. Culture. I. Valsiner, Jaan. II. Rosa, Alberto.
HM1033.C34 2007
306.01–dc22      2006034612

ISBN 978-0-521-85410-8 hardback
ISBN 978-0-521-67005-0 paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for
the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or
third-party Internet Web sites referred to in this publication
and does not guarantee that any content on such
Web sites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.





Contents



Preface page ix
Contributors xiii
Editors’ Introduction: Contemporary Social-Cultural Research: Uniting Culture, Society, and Psychology 1
Jaan Valsiner and Alberto Rosa
PART I:   THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
1   The Myth, and Beyond: Ontology of Psyche and Epistemology of Psychology 23
  Jaan Valsiner and Alberto Rosa
2   Language, Cognition, Subjectivity: A Dynamic Constitution 40
  Thomas Slunecko and Sophie Hengl
3   Psychology within Time: Theorizing about the Making of Socio-Cultural Psychology 62
  Jorge Castro-Tejerina and Alberto Rosa
4   Sampling Reconsidered: Idiographic Science and the Analysis of Personal Life Trajectories 82
  Tatsuya Sato, Yuko Yasuda, Ayae Kido, Ayumu Arakawa, Hazime Mizoguchi, and Jaan Valsiner
PART II:   FROM NATURE TO CULTURE
5   The Windowless Room: ‘Mediationism’ and How to Get Over It 109
  Alan Costall
6   Functional Systems of Perception-Action and Re-Mediation 124
  David Travieso
7   Comparative Development of Communication: An Evolutionary Perspective 140
  Adolfo Perinat
8   The Material Practices of Ape Language Research 164
  William Mintz Fields, Pär Segerdahl, and Sue Savage-Rumbaugh
9   The End of Myths and Legends About the Biological and Cultural Evolution: A New View in the Knowledge on Hominid Paleo-Ethoecology 187
  Jordi Serrallonga
PART III:   FROM ORIENTATION TO MEANING
10   Acts of Psyche: Actuations as Synthesis of Semiosis and Action 205
  Alberto Rosa
11   Time and Movement in Symbol Formation 238
  Silvia Español
12   Object Use, Communication, and Signs: The Triadic Basis of Early Cognitive Development 257
  Cintia Rodríguez
13   Network of Meanings: A Theoretical-Methodological Perspective for the Investigation of Human Developmental Processes 277
  M. Clotilde Rossetti-Ferreira, Katia S. Amorim, and Ana Paula S. Silva
PART IV:   SYMBOLIC RESOURCES FOR THE CONSTITUTION OF EXPERIENCE
14   Dramaturgical Actuations and Symbolic Communication: Or How Beliefs Make Up Reality 293
  Alberto Rosa
15   Analysis of Cultural Emotion: Understanding of Indigenous Psychology for Universal Implications 318
  Sang-Chin Choi, Gyuseog Han, and Chung-Woon Kim
16   The Role of Symbolic Resources in Human Lives 343
  Tania Zittoun
17   Perpetual Uncertainty of Cultural Life: Becoming Reality 362
  Emily Abbey
18   Prayer and the Kingdom of Heaven: Psychological Tools for Directivity 373
  Pablo del Río and Amelia Álvarez
19   “Myself, the Project”: Sociocultural Interpretations of Young Adulthood 404
  Jeanette A. Lawrence and Agnes E. Dodds
PART V:   FROM SOCIETY TO THE PERSON THROUGH CULTURE
20   Apprenticeship in Conversation and Culture: Emerging Sociability in Preschool Peer Talk 423
  Michal Hamo and Shoshana Blum-Kulka
21   The Creation of New Cultures in Peer Interaction 444
  William A. Corsaro and Berit O. Johannesen
22   “Culture Has No Internal Territory”: Culture as Dialogue 460
  Eugene Matusov, Mark Smith, Maria Alburquerque Candela, and Keren Lilu
23   Cultural-Historical Approaches to Designing for Development 484
  Michael Cole and Yrjö Engeström
24   Money as a Cultural Tool Mediating Personal Relationships: Child Development of Exchange and Possession 508
  Toshiya Yamamoto and Noboru Takahashi
25   The Family: Negotiating Cultural Values 524
  Nandita Chaudhary
PART VI:   FROM SOCIAL CULTURE TO PERSONAL CULTURE
26   Culture and Social Representations 543
  Gerard Duveen
27   The Institutions Inside: Self, Morality, and Culture 560
  Piero Paolicchi
28   Identity, Rights, and Duties: The Illustrative Case of Positioning by Iran, the United States, and the European Union 576
  Fathali M. Moghaddam and Kathryn A. Kavulich
29   Symbolic Politics and Cultural Symbols: Identity Formation Between and Beyond Nations and States 591
  Ulf Hedetoft
30   The Dialogical Self: Social, Personal, and (Un)Conscious 608
  João Salgado and Miguel Gonçalves
PART VII:   MAKING SENSE OF THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE: MEMORY AND SELF-REFLECTION
31   Social and Cognitive Determinants of Collective Memory for Public Events 625
  Guglielmo Bellelli, Antonietta Curci, and Giovanna Leone
32   Collective Memory 645
  James V. Wertsch
33   Issues in the Socio-Cultural Study of Memory: Making Memory Matter 661
  David Middleton and Steven D. Brown
34   The Social Basis of Self-Reflection 678
  Alex Gillespie
General Conclusions: Socio-Cultural Psychology on the Move: Semiotic Methodology in the Making 692
  Alberto Rosa and Jaan Valsiner
Index 709




Preface



It is taken for granted that any existing disciplinary field must have handbooks readily available for its students and researchers. This is the first Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology to appear with such a title, and so its appearance acts as a sort of landmark for its official constitution as a field. But no volume can give birth to an area of research, at the most it can only signal the crossing of a threshold. When shaping such a volume what the editors do is to surf above the agitated surface of disciplinary tides, making figures which make apparent the force of waves of researchers who have been gathering strength from a long time effort.

   Social and cultural life are indissociable from the threads which make up the fabric of the human Psyche. The very forefathers of Psychology did not fail in acknowledging this. However, their early insights and contributions were left aside from the mainstream of a fast-growing Psychology. Psychology was quick in recognizing Psyche’s biological and social roots but took its time in setting itself into the inquiry of how culture shapes human psychological processes and how cultural change (History) leaves its traces on the working of the mind.

   As in any other up-growing contemporary disciplinary field, Socio-Cultural Psychology was a curiosity – it branched out of many traditions of research and received many names. Most of them gather the adjectives Folk, Cultural, Social, and Historical besides the name Psychology in different combinations. Whatever way one chooses to call it, there was always a common concern for the psychological study of distinctly human psychological phenomena, but without losing sight that human phenomena are themselves always also natural and biological.

   The very nature of the research field of Sociocultural Psychology makes it a branch of the psychological sciences that continuously needs to cross the disciplinary borders and to collaborate with the social sciences and the humanities. So, to call for a specialised field of Sociocultural Psychology is a sort of oxymoron. Sociocultural Psychology cannot leave aside anything that is human; its challenge is to address its complexity and provide tools for its explanation and understanding. Sociocultural Psychology is both a field of Psychology and a cross-disciplinary endeavour. That is why empirical work has always to be hand in hand with a theoretical concern always shuttling across disciplinary boundaries. Vygotsky’s claim for a general psychology was an early demand for not losing sight of the complexity of the task when going into a particular research project.

   A handbook always attempts to present as completely as possible the field it covers by gathering significant contributions. This has to be done by selecting topics and authors so that a Gestalt of the state of the field can be made to appear. This no doubt is a result of the choosing of the editors who, when so doing, are making an interpretation of the past and present of the discipline, but also cast a message conveying their view about promising possible future developments of the field. An argument, running through the volume as a whole, so arises. And, as it could not be otherwise, sketches a structure of sub-areas, hints to continuities, but also makes apparent gaps and inconsistencies which signal challenges to the future. The result is a figure arising from a patchwork better or not as well knitted together. It is the contrast between figures and the background provided by the other figures which makes the dynamics of the field to exist and set the ground for the dialogues which keep together the common endeavor of the community of researchers, so that the field keeps continuously on the move.

   A dynamic disciplinary field arises because of socio-cultural interests on the study of some kind of phenomena. A community of knowledge develops around the cultivation of these interests. This community maps the domain, and when exploring it lays out a network of methods, of paths, crisscrossing the field and so making possible to transit from some regions to others. But roads should not be confused with the landscape. They just scrub on its surface and may leave aside blank spaces in the map, sometimes so much ignored that may not even have the mark terra ignota written upon them. A community of researchers should not be confused with a corporation of logistics only concerned with fast transportation through well-paved roads, so that goods can be speedily made available to the destination market. Researchers are explorers, not caravaneers. If they keep together along well-trodden paths, celebrating being together when traveling, they may enjoy themselves, but they would not make much service to the expansion of knowledge of the field. Orthodoxies may have some advantages when penetrating in a foreign field but can become a deleterious trap when one wants to go deeper into it. An advised traveler pays more attention to the landscape than to the road. But when doing so, a price has to be paid: either one travels slowly paying homage to the rules of the road, or one may crash. When so doing, one behaves as a sort of tourist, taking pictures which are very much like postcards already available in kiosks. The real thrill is in leaving the road, making new paths as moving on the land. But this also has a price. The journey is uncertain and solitary, one may get lost, and perhaps nobody else would find interesting to visit that part of the realm, so that no road (method) would ever be developed to cross through it. Researchers have to balance between getting credit from moving fast along the communication lines for the commerce of knowledge (orthodoxies) and the more risky business of opening new vistas on the phenomena to study.

   The authors here gathered are explorers and road builders so the knowledge they produce could be shared. Some are well seasoned and enjoy ample credit, but all of them together, when sharing with us their views, make us contemplate a vista of directions to explore and feel invited to use their methods to go further ahead in our journey. They together form a variegated company coming from different corners of the world, engaged in exploring their disciplinary areas, speaking many different languages, always attentive to what is going on beyond their immediate neighborhood, and eager to enter into dialogue with the others. They were enthusiastic in joining this common enterprise and made the editors feel obliged to them for making the task of putting together this volume both a challenge and a pleasure.

   This handbook, as any other human enterprise, has its own history. Its birth was summoned by Philip Laughlin who – with Cambridge University Press – foresaw the actuality of the area and suggested that the time had come to set up the field with a definitive handbook. Eric Schwartz followed Philip in equally enthusiastic support. We are also deeply grateful for the careful management of the production of the book by Peter Katsirubas, of Aptara, Inc., whose detailed suggestions and work with high-quality copy editors made the editing process a great pleasure. A team of enthusiastic assistants also participated in the editing process. Ignacio Brescó, Marcela Lonchuk, Tomás Sánchez-Criado, Irina Rasskin, and Silviana Rubio dealt with the tedious task of checking references and manuscripts.





Contributors



EMILY ABBEY
Department of Psychology, Box 38A
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610, USA
EAbbey@holycross.edu

AMELIA ÁLVAREZ
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Facultad de Humanidades, Comunicación y Documentación
Madrid 133
28093 Getafe, Madrid, Spain
amelia.alvarez@uc3m.es

KATIA S. AMORIM
Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras
de Ribeirão Preto – USP
Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900
14.040-901 Ribeirão Preto (São Paulo), Brazil
katiamorim@ffclrp.com.br

AYUMU ARAKAWA
Law School
Nagoya University
Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture
464-8601, Japan
arakawa12a@hotmail.com

GUGLIELMO BELLELLI
Dipartimento di Psicologia
Università di Bari
Palazzo Ateneo
Piazza Umberto I, 1,
I-70100 Bari, Italia
g.bellelli@psico.uniba.it

SHOSHANA BLUM-KULKA
Department of Communication and Journalism
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
IL- 91905Jerusalem 91905, Israel
Shoshana.blum-kulka@huji.ac.il

STEVEN D. BROWN
Department of Human Sciences
Loughborough University
Loughborough, LE11 3TU, Great Britain
S.D.Brown@lboro.ac.uk

MARIA ALBURQUERQUE CANDELA
School of Education
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716, USA
mariacandela@gmx.net

JORGE CASTRO-TEJERINA
Facultad de Psicología
Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia
Juan del Rosal, 10
Ciudad Universitaria
ES-28040 Madrid, Spain
jorge.castro@psi.uned.es

NANDITA CHAUDHARY
Department of Child Development
Lady Irwin College
Sikandra Road
New Delhi – 110001, India
nanditachau@rediffmail.com

SANG-CHIN CHOI
Department of Psychology
Chung-Ang University
Seoul, Korea
choi@cau.ac.kr

MICHAEL COLE
Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition
University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive,
La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
mcole@weber.ucsd.edu

WILLIAM A. CORSARO
Department of Sociology
Indiana University
Ballantine Hall 744
1020 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47405-7103, USA
corsaro@indiana.edu

ALAN COSTALL
Department of Psychology
University of Portsmouth
Portsmouth, PO1 2DY, England
alan.costall@port.ac.uk

ANTONIETTA CURCI
Dipartimento di Psicologia
Università di Bari
Palazzo Ateneo
Piazza Umberto I, 1
I-70100 Bari, Italia
a.curcci@psico.uniba.it

AGNES E. DODDS
Medical Education Unit
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
The University of Melbourne
Melbourne Vic 3010, Australia
agnesed@unimelb.edu.au

GERARD DUVEEN
Department of Social and Developmental Psychology
Faculty of Social and Political Sciences
University of Cambridge
Free School Lane
Cambridge CB2 3RQ, Great Britain
gmd10@cam.ac.uk

YRJÖ ENGESTRÖM
Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research
P.O. Box 26
00014 University of Helsinki
Finland
yrjo.engestrom@helsinki.fi

SILVIA ESPAÑOL
Instituto de Investigaciones
Facultad de Psicología
Universidad de Buenos Aires
Av. Independencia 3065 3°
Capital Federal (cp:C1225AAM)
República Argentina
silviaes@psi.uba.ar

WILLIAM MINTZ FIELDS
Great Ape Trust of Iowa
4200 SE 44th Avenue Des Moines, IA 50320, USA
panbanisha@aol.com

ALEX GILLESPIE
Department of Psychology
University of Stirling
Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland
alex.gillespie@stir.ac.uk

MIGUEL GONÇALVES
Department of Psychology
University of Minho
4710 Braga
Portugal
mgoncalves@iep.uminho.pt

MICHAL HAMO
Department of Communication and Journalism
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
IL- 91905 Jerusalem 91905, Israel

GYUSEOG HAN
Department of Psychology
Chonnam National University
Gwangju, S. Korea
ghan@chonnam.ac.kr

ULF HEDETOFT
Director of the Saxo Institute of
History, Ethnology, Archaeology
Faculty of Humanities
University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Hedetoft@ihis.aau.dk

SOPHIE HENGL
Faculty of Psychology
University of Vienna
Liebiggasse 5
A-1010 Vienna, Austria
s.hengl@gmx.net

BERIT O. JOHANNESEN
Department of Psychology
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
NO-7491Trondheim, Norway
Berit.johannesen@svt.ntnu.no

KATHRYN A. KAVULICH
Department of Psychology
White Gravenor Building, 3rd floor
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20057, USA

AYAE KIDO
Faculty of Education
Kyoto University
Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-city
Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan
mi_chu_chu_lm@yahoo.co.jp

CHUNG-WOON KIM
Department of Leisure Studies
Myongji University
Seoul, Korea
cwkim@mju.ac.kr

JEANETTE A. LAWRENCE
School of Behavioural Science
The University of Melbourne
Melbourne Vic 3010, Australia
lawrence@unimelb.edu.au

GIOVANNA LEONE
Dipartimento di Sociologia e Comunicazione
Università di Roma La Sapienza
Via Salaria, 113
I-00198 Roma, Italia
giovanna.leone@uniroma1.it

KEREN LILU
School of Education
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716, USA
k_lilu@hotmail.com

EUGENE MATUSOV
School of Education
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716, USA
ematusov@udel.edu

DAVID MIDDLETON
Department of Human Sciences
Loughborough University
Loughborough, LE11 3TU, Great Britain
D.J.Middleton@lboro.ac.uk

HAZIME MIZOGUCHI
Faculty of Social Welfare
Rissho University
1700 Magechi Kumagaya-city
Saitama, 360-0194, Japan
hazime@ris.ac.jp

FATHALI M. MOGHADDAM
Department of Psychology
White Gravenor Building, 3rd floor
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20057, USA
moghaddf@georgetown.edu

PIERO PAOLICCHI
Dipartimento di Scienze Sociali
Università di Pisa
Via S. Maria 46
I-56126 Pisa, Italy
paolicchi@dss.unipi.it

ADOLFO PERINAT
Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona
Facultad de Psicología
Dptoo Psicología Básica, Evolutiva y de la Educación
Campus de Bellaterra
ES-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
adolf.perinat@uab.es

PABLO DEL RÍO
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Facultad de Humanidades, Comunicación y Documentación
Madrid 133
28093 Getafe, Madrid, Spain
prio@hum.uc3m.es

CINTIA RODRÍGUEZ
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Facultad de Formación de Profesorado y Educación
Cantoblanco
ES-28049 Madrid, Spain
cintia.rodriguez@uam.es

ALBERTO ROSA
Dpto. de Psicología Básica
Facultad de Psicología
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Cantoblanco
ES-28049 Madrid, Spain
alberto.rosa@uam.es

M. CLOTILDE ROSSETTI-FERREIRA
Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras
de Ribeirão Preto – USP
Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900
14.040-901 Ribeirão Preto (São Paulo), Brazil
mcrferre@usp.br

JOÃO SALGADO
Instituto Superior da Maia
Av. Carlos Oliveira Campos
4475-695 Avioso S. Pedro
Portugal
jsalgado@ismai.pt

TATSUYA SATO
Department of Psychology
Ritsumeikan University
56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku,
Kyoto 603-8577 Japan
satot@lt.ritsumei.ac.jp

E. SUE SAVAGE-RUMBAUGH
Great Ape Trust of Iowa
4200 SE 44th Avenue
Des Moines, IA 50321, USA
ssavage-rumbaugh@greatanetrust.org

PÄR SEGERDAHL
Centre for Bioethics
Faculty of Philosophy
Uppsala University
SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden
Par.Segerdahl@bioethics.uu.se

JORDI SERRALLONGA
HOMINID Human Origins Group
Science Park of Barcelona
Universitat de Barcelona
C/ Adolf Florensa 8
ES-08028 Barcelona, Spain
jserrallonga@ub.edu

ANA PAULA S. SILVA
Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras
de Ribeirão Preto – USP
Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900
14.040-901 Ribeirão Preto (São Paulo), Brazil

THOMAS SLUNECKO
Faculty of Psychology,
University of Vienna
Liebiggasse 5
A-1010 Vienna, Austria
thomas.slunecko@univie.ac.at

MARK SMITH
School of Education
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716, USA
mpsmith@UDel.Edu

NOBORU TAKAHASHI
Osaka Kyoiku University
Osaka, Japan

DAVID TRAVIESO
Dpto. de Psicología Básica
Facultad de Psicología
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Cantoblanco
ES-28049 Madrid, Spain
david.travieso@uam.es

JAAN VALSINER
Frances L. Hyatt School of Psychology
Clark University
950 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01610, USA
jvalsiner@clarku.edu

JAMES V. WERTSCH
Department of Anthropology
Washington University
St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
jwertsch@wustl.edu

TOSHIYA YAMAMOTO
Maebashi Kyoai Gakuen College
1154-4, Koyahara
379-2192 Maebashi, Gunma, Japan
HAE00142@nifty.com

YUKO YASUDA
Faculty of Education
Kyoto University
Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-city
Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan
yuko-y@kcat.zaq.ne.jp

TANIA ZITTOUN
Institut de Psychologie
Université de Lausanne
Anthropole
CH-1015 Lausanne
Switzerland
Tania.Zittoun@unil.ch





The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology


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