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The Literature of Satire
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Details

  • Page extent: 340 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.596 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 809.7
  • Dewey version: 21
  • LC Classification: PN6149.S2 K48 2004
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Satire--History and criticism

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521834605 | ISBN-10: 0521834600)

The Literature of Satire is an accessible but sophisticated and wide-ranging study of satire from the classics to the present in plays, novels and the press as well as in verse. In it Charles Knight analyses the rhetorical problems created by satire's complex relations to its community, and examines how it exploits the genres it borrows. He argues that satire derives from an awareness of the differences between appearance, ideas and discourse. Knight provides illuminating readings of such satirists familiar and unfamiliar as Horace, Lucian, Jonson, Molière, Swift, Pope, Byron, Flaubert, Ostrovsky, Kundera, and Rushdie. This broad-ranging examination sheds light on the nature and functions of satire as a mode of writing, as well as on theoretical approaches to it. It will be of interest to scholars interested in literary theory as well as those specifically interested in satire.

• A broad-ranging and accessible study of satire which expands the scope of satire beyond poetry to include plays, novels and the press • Covers not only major British texts, but important satires from a number of countries and periods • Will be of interest to literary scholars and those interested in literary theory

Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction: the satiric frame of mind; Part I. Satiric Boundaries: 1. Imagination's Cerebrus; 2. Satiric nationalism; 3. Satiric exile; Part II. Satiric Forms: 4. Satire as performance; 5. Horatian performances; 6. Satire and the novel; 7. Literature and the press: the Battle of Dunkirk; 8. White snow and black magic: Karl Kraus and the press; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

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