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The Politics of Property Rights
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Details

  • 5 b/w illus. 1 map 64 tables
  • Page extent: 406 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.77 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 320/.6/0972/0904
  • Dewey version: 21
  • LC Classification: HC135 .H173 2003
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Mexico--Economic policy
    • Right of property--Mexico--History
    • Mexico--Politics and government--19th century
    • Mexico--Politics and government--20th century

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521820677 | ISBN-10: 0521820677)

This book addresses a puzzle in political economy: why is it that political instability does not necessarily translate into economic stagnation or collapse? In order to address this puzzle, it advances a theory about property rights systems in many less developed countries. In this theory, governments do not have to enforce property rights as a public good. Instead, they may enforce property rights selectively (as a private good), and share the resulting rents with the group of asset holders who are integrated into the government. Focusing on Mexico, this book explains how the property rights system was constructed during the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship (1876–1911) and then explores how this property rights system either survived, or was reconstructed. The result is an analytic economic history of Mexico under both stability and instability, and a generalizable framework about the interaction of political and economic institutions.

• This is the first analytic economic history of Mexico • This book explores a fundamental puzzle in political economy: why political instability doesn't necessarily translate into economic stagnation or collapse • This book develops a theory about property rights systems in which governments enforce property rights as private goods

Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Theory: instability, credible commitments, and growth; 3. VPI coalitions in historical perspective: Mexico's turbulent politics, 1876–1929; 4. Finance; 5. Industry; 6. Petroleum; 7. Mining; 8. Agriculture; 9. Conclusion.

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