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Bioterrorism with CD-ROM
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Details

  • 10 b/w illus. 2 colour illus. 29 tables
  • Page extent: 376 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 0.988 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 363.34/97
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: RC88.9.T47 B57 2004
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Bioterrorism--Psychological aspects
    • Bioterrorism--Social aspects
    • Public health
    • Disaster medicine
    • Emergency management

Library of Congress Record

1 Hardback, 1 CD-ROM

 (ISBN-13: 9780521814720 | ISBN-10: 0521814723)

After the sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway system in 1995 just 12 people died but more than 5000 sought medical care for possible exposure. Bacteria, viruses, gases and prions can create chaos and disruption on a national and international scale. Moreover, bioterrorism is believed to incur the most devastating psychological sequelae of all disasters and terrorist events. Planning and pre-disaster exercises are essential for preventing panic; allocating resources; preventing transmission of disease; devising effective mental health interventions; providing trustworthy and good quality information; and training in how to handle fear, demoralization, and public loss of confidence in national institutions. Including two CDs showing an international panel of experts discussing and teaching how best to plan for a bioterrorist event, this book is essential reading for mental health professionals, health care providers, public health officials and community leaders involved in preparation, treatment and planning for bioterrorism.

• The only book specifically about bioterrorism • Written by experts in the forefront of public health policy planning for terrorism and bioterrorism in particular • Includes two CDs showing an international panel of experts discussing and teaching how best to plan for a bioterrorist event

Contents

Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Planning for the psychological effects of bioterrorism Carol S. Fullerton, Robert J. Ursano and Ann E. Norwood; Part II. The Risk of Bioterrorism: History and Society: 2. Psyche at risk, psyche as armor: biodefense as primary prevention Joshua Lederberg; 3. Let's make new mistakes: planning for public health and civil defense Dale Smith; 4. Lessons from the 1918 pandemic influenza: psychosocial consequences of a catastrophic outbreak of disease Monica Schoch-Spana; 5. A new terrorism threat environment: bioterrorism paradigm shift John Parachini; 6. Prospects for chemical/biological terrorism: psychological incentives and constraints Jerrold M. Post; Part III. Effects on Individuals and Communities: 7. Differentiating manifestations of infection from psychiatric disorders and fears of having been exposed to bioterrorism James R. Rundell and George W. Christopher; 8. Planning for chemical and biological terrorism: experiences from the Sydney Olympics Beverley Raphael and Michael Hills; 9. Biopsychosocial factors in bioterrorism: consequences for psychiatric care, society and public health Harry C. Holloway and Douglas Waldrep; 10. The psychological effect of a community-wide disaster on children: planning for bioterrorism Jon A. Shaw and Seana Shaw; 11. Terrorist events using radioactive materials: lessons for bioterrorism Arnfinn Tønnessen and Lars Weisæth; 12. Social support in the aftermath of disaster, catastrophes, and acts of terrorism: altruistic, overwhelmed, uncertain, antagonistic, and patriotic communities Krzysztof Kaniasty and Fran H. Norris; Part IV. Bioterrorism and the Public's Health: 13. The 2001 anthrax attacks and the media Ann E. Norwood, Mary E. Walsh and Molly J. Hall; 14. Emotional and psychiatric effects of weapons of mass destruction on first responders Richard C. W. Hall, Ryan C. W. Hall and Marcia J. Chapman; 15. The psychological consequences of bioterrorism: a strategy for planning, preparedness, response and recovery Robert DeMartino and Brian W. Flynn; 16. Legal aspects of bioterrorism and infectious disease outbreaks James G. Hodge and Gabriel B. Eber; 17. Communicating the risks of bioterrorism Tim L. Tinker and Elaine Vaughan; Part V. Conclusion: 18. Behavioral and mental health responses to bioterrorism: needs for the public's health Robert J. Ursano, Carol S. Fullerton and Ann E. Norwood; Index.

Reviews

'This is a superb book that will provide clinicians, researchers, and community leaders with an in-depth understanding of the consequences of a bioterrorism attack and help them better prepare and respond to future events.' Doody's Book Reviews

'… a very comprehensive review of Bio terrorism … the book provides a good insight into the history, psychosocial, mental and public health of the population in relation to Bio terrorism. It is a useful addition to Emergency Planners and professionals dealing with major disasters. The accompanying CDs are a welcome addition to the book'. The Ulster Medical Journal

'… if a dirty bomb explodes on your watch you will be glad to have this book in your emergency response bag.' Journal of Psychological Medicine

Contributors

Carol S. Fullerton, Robert J. Ursano, Ann E. Norwood, Joshua Lederberg, Dale Smith, Monica Schoch-Spana, John Parachini, Jerrold M. Post, James R. Rundell, George W. Christopher, Beverley Raphael, Michael Hills, Harry C. Holloway, Douglas Waldrep, Jon A. Shaw, Seana Shaw, Arnfinn Tønnessen, Lars Weisæth, Krzysztof Kaniasty, Fran H. Norris, Ann E. Norwood, Mary E. Walsh, Molly J. Hall, Richard C. W. Hall, Ryan C. W. Hall, Marcia J. Chapman, Robert DeMartino, Brian W. Flynn, James G. Hodge, Gabriel B. Eber, Tim L. Tinker, Elaine Vaughan

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