Cambridge Catalogue  
  • Help
Home > Catalogue > Modernism and Time
Modernism and Time
Google Book Search

Search this book

Details

  • Page extent: 0 pages

Adobe eBook Reader

 (ISBN-13: 9780511033438)

In Modernism and Time, Ronald Schleifer analyses the transition from the Enlightenment to post-Enlightenment ways of understanding in Western thought. Schleifer argues that this transition in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century expresses itself centrally in an altered conception of temporality. He examines this period's remarkable breaks with the past in literature, music, and the arts more generally. Whereas Enlightenment thought sees time as a homogenous, neutral medium, in which events and actions take place, post-Enlightenment thought sees time as discontinuous and inexorably bound up with both the subjects and events that seem to inhabit it. This fundamental change of perception, Schleifer argues, takes place across disciplines as varied as physics, economics and philosophy. Schleifer's study engages with the work of writers and thinkers as varied as George Eliot, Walter Benjamin, Einstein and Russell, and offers a powerful reassessment of the politics and culture of modernism.

• A powerful reassessment of the politics and culture of modernism; very strong area of literature list • A broad-based study across a range of disciplines from literature, music, and the arts more generally to physics, economics and philosophy • Engages with the work of writers and thinkers as diverse as George Eliot, Walter Benjamin, Einstein and Russell

Contents

Introduction: Post-Enlightenment modernism and the experience of time; Part I. Post-Enlightenment Apprehension: 1. The Enlightenment, abundance, and postmodernity; 2. Temporal allegories: George Eliot, Walter Benjamin, and the redemption of time; 3. The second industrial revolution: history, knowledge, and subjectivity; Part II. Logics of Abundance: 4. The natural history of time: mathematics and meaning in Einstein and Russell; 5. Analogy and example: Heisenberg, linguistic negation, and the language of quantum physics; 6. The global aesthetics of genre: Mikhail Bakhtin and the borders of modernity.

printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis